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What to do...
#92862 March 3rd, 2007 at 07:17 PM
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Tonya Offline OP
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My "garden area is mostly sand(we live so close to the coast, it is almost all sand) and I was wondering what I need to add for my veggies to be happy. I'm thinking some peat, maybe some gypsum(sp) and some "garden soil" or good bagged type soil. Any suggestions for additives or any ideas would be sooooo appreciated.

Re: What to do...
#92863 March 3rd, 2007 at 09:22 PM
Joined: Mar 2005
T
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Don't need gypsum that's for clay soil. The exact opposite problem from what you have. You don't want peat either. You want heavy soil. One with a high clay content so it will stay where you put it. A peat would fly away I think. Although I've got heavy clay so I don't have first hand experience with your problem

Good luck getting your garden started.

Re: What to do...
#92864 March 4th, 2007 at 03:44 AM
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tonya, the best thing to improve your soil is huge amounts of organic matter. Preferably compost, but manures, leaves, grass clippings etc will all add to the soil. Don't buy in a heap of garden soil, it'll just be lost into the sand. See if you can get a few cubic yards of compost delivered. More is better. You can add as much as 10 inches or so deep over the area. It needs to be aged if it is manures or grass clippings. Also, always mulch your soil. This will add more organic matter slowly replacing any that leaches away.
Consider starting your own composting system. Doesn't need to cost anything.
A worm farm also dispenses good stuff to get into your soil. Easy care pets too.
Use organic fertilisers like fish emulsion and chicken manures as well as plant tonics like seaweed extracts. These keep the bacteria and other lifeforms healthy in your soil and help promote creation of humus. The rotted organic matter which plants use.
All this doesn't tend to happen in one season but just keep it up and over time your soil can be extremely healthy and productive.

Alternatively, you can always build up your beds on top of the sand using the above materials but in greater quantities. It depends what is available in the way of organic matter.

Re: What to do...
#92865 March 4th, 2007 at 04:51 AM
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Tonya, if you don't have a soil test kit, you might think about getting one. If you don't want to bother with one, take a soil sample to your local extension office (usually listed in the phone book under court house offices) & let them test it for you. Once they find out what your soil has (& doesn't have) they'll be able to tell you what you should do to ammend it according to what you're planning to plant.

As for the consistency of veggie garden soil, I'd actually welcome sand in mine, as there is a lot of clay in the soil here. (My Beets & Carrots would love to have a lighter soil that they could send their roots down into!) Longy's suggestion of setting up your own composting system is an excellent one, cuz you'd have a good consistency AND nitrition for your plants! clp

Re: What to do...
#92866 March 4th, 2007 at 05:02 AM
Joined: Apr 2003
Compost Queen!
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They've all given you good advise..

Mine is COMPOST!!!

You'd be amazed what it does to any soil ...

Re: What to do...
#92867 March 5th, 2007 at 12:42 AM
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Tonya Offline OP
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I had started a compost pile/bin last year and there is a bit of useable material there(it got abandoned when we thought we were moving ters ). I will look into getting a couple truckloads or so of compost delivered from the local nursery. I am looking for a one season fix because we hope to have the house drama resolved before next year and will work on the soil there.

Patty- If the shipping wouldn't kill me- I would gladly send you a ton or two of my sand. I don't even really have grass due to the amount of sand in my yard. It is probably close to 100% sand until you get about 20 inches deep. Then it turns "darker" like it is mixed with a bit of dirt(this is near the wood line so it is probably just rotted organic matter) I would LOVE to get rid of some sand! :p

Re: What to do...
#92868 March 5th, 2007 at 03:38 AM
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Compost Queen!
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Quote
Originally posted by Tonya:
I had started a compost pile/bin last year and there is a bit of useable material there(it got abandoned when we thought we were moving ters
That stuff should still be very good to use..
And even if it's not done, throw it into
some plastic heavy duty garbage...
It should be fine to hold over in there until
you need it or if you move...
*just poke a hole or two into it so it can get air..*

Re: What to do...
#92869 March 5th, 2007 at 05:30 AM
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Tonya, I would gladly trade you some clay soil for your sand! laugh laugh laugh laugh I have been amending my all beds with compost and it has worked wonders, thumbup but it has been a long, drawn-out process. frown

Re: What to do...
#92870 March 5th, 2007 at 12:46 PM
Joined: Aug 2005
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Get a soil test done. It's the only REAL way of knowing what your soil is or isn't lacking. Otherwise.....Organic Matter!!!!!! Like Longy said. Make your own compost or find some manure.


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