This set of forums is an archive of our old CGI-Based forum platform (UBB.Classic) that was never imported to our current forum (UBB.threads); as such, no new postings or registrations are allowed here.

Please instead direct all questions and postings to the our current forum here.
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
#89056 September 12th, 2006 at 04:22 AM
Joined: Mar 2006
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: Mar 2006
Can I use some kind of covered garbage can to make compost in? I have many critters running around my yard and I think they would be in it all the time if I didn't have it covered.

#89057 September 12th, 2006 at 08:14 AM
Joined: Apr 2003
Compost Queen!
Offline
Compost Queen!
Joined: Apr 2003
Yes, you can.....
I would suggest a plastic can...
*Metal one's rust, although, for regular plants, I'm sure it would be fine... I think for me, I wouldn't use one *metal* for food~gardening composting... does that make sense??*

There's alot of info here on composting..
We love it here.. grinnnn
If you do a FORUM SEARCH, type in COMPOST, COMPOSTING... and you should find alot of posts/threads about it..

and do not hesitate to flw composters out...

And there's never a silly question,
*well, it's only silly if you don't ask it*

We'll get you composting in no time at all!!!

#89058 September 12th, 2006 at 01:33 PM
Joined: Feb 2006
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Feb 2006
Plantqueen, you can use either a metal or plastic trash can for composting, but I would drill holes in the bottom of the can to allow for drainage and then drill holes in the side to allow air to enter. If you use a plastic trash can I would suggest getting a black one because the black color will accelerate the heating process. If you get one with a tight fitting lid or locking lid you can turn it on it's side and roll it back and forth to mix and aerate the compost.

#89059 September 12th, 2006 at 08:58 PM
Joined: Mar 2006
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: Mar 2006
Great ideas! Thanks for your help! I think I will go shopping for a trash can today!!! I found a thread that gave info on what you can put into your compost pile and what you can't so I printed that out. Hopefully that will get me started. I'm sure I will have plenty more questions.

#89060 September 14th, 2006 at 07:53 AM
Joined: Sep 2004
H
Junior Member
Offline
Junior Member
H
Joined: Sep 2004
Patches-that's a great idea about rolling the can! Makes my job 1000 times easier-Thanks!!!

#89061 September 15th, 2006 at 06:07 AM
Joined: May 2006
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: May 2006
Patches,

Is composting as easy as everyone is making it sound? Let me make sure I understand this...
All I need to start is a black, plastic trash can with a locking lid and holes in the sides and bottom. Then I should add greens (grass clippings) and browns (leaves) and uncooked veggie/fruit scraps in layers. Next I need to roll this trash can around to make sure it all mixes together. And next spring, I should have compost for my flower beds? Do I need to add anything else...dirt, maybe? I have an apple tree in my yard. Will the apples work in place of the veggies? I am so anxious to start composting.

#89062 September 15th, 2006 at 08:06 AM
Joined: Feb 2006
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Feb 2006
Mocha, making compost is really very easy. wink After you get your trash can, I would suggest using a 1/4" bit and drilling holes so air can get into it on the sides and do the same thing on the bottom for drainage.

Then you add your "greens" and "browns" and here is the list I use of things you can put in your compost and things you should NOT put in your compost. I don't add any dirt to mine, but some people do. Compost needs both air and water, so you have to keep your pile/bin moist, but NOT wet. I should feel like a damp sponge. wink

I try to turn my compost a couple of times a week when possible (but I can't in the winter). I would roll the can a couple of times a week, or at least once a week. You'll have some awesome "Black Gold" in the spring and your plants and veggies will love you! luv

What TO Compost

Common "Brown" (high-carbon) Ingredients
Dry Leaves
Hay and Straw
Corncobs, Stalks, Vegetable Stalks
Shredded Paper (no colored ink)
Pine Needles
Wood Chips and Sawdust
Wood Ash (in moderation)

Common "Green" (high-nitrogen) Ingredients:
Grass, Lawn Clippings, Fresh Leaves
weeds and Other Garden Wastes
Eggshells, Coffee Grounds, Paper Filters
Kitchen Scraps, Vegetable & Fruit Parings
Horse and Cow Manure
Feathers, Hair, Lint, Sweepings
Seaweed

What NOT to Compost (details)
Chemically-treated Wood Products
Chemically-treated Materials
Diseased plants
Human Waste
Meat, Bones, and Fatty Foods
Plastic, Glass, or Metals
Paper with Colored Inks
Pernicious weeds
Pet Wastes

#89063 September 15th, 2006 at 09:40 AM
Joined: May 2006
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: May 2006
Thanks Patches!!! I hope I am able to refer back to your post to get my own compost pile started!

#89064 September 27th, 2006 at 01:01 AM
Joined: May 2006
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: May 2006
Ok, I am back from Hawaii with plants to start for next year and I'm ready to start my composting pile. I have my black trash can with the locking lid. I have my apples and plenty of grass.

1. How many holes should I drill on the sides and bottom?

2. Is it true I need to start with hay or straw? Does it matter what I start with?...apples, grass or leaves?

3. If I start today will I have compost by next spring?

4. I only have the one trash can, do I need more or should I buy a sifter?


Anxiously awaiting my own "Black Gold". LoL

#89065 November 5th, 2006 at 12:36 PM
Joined: Mar 2006
P
Member
Offline
Member
P
Joined: Mar 2006
how many holes?
as many as seems prudent without letting the
stuff inside out. remember that your compost will be breaking down and to many holes will let
the stuff sift out when you roll it.
hay or straw on the bottom?
i would start with whatever browns you have. i might be wrong but it just seems to make sense to me not to start with greens first as they are
not what the majority is about.
if i start today.
maybe , more than likely,it will be a bit before
your compost is ready. but what you will have could probably be dug in to your garden first thing in the spring. it will still help your soil.
is one can enough?
i really dont know. i simply start a pile on the ground . i have room so it isnt a problem for me.
i dont need to contain it and while the surrounding plant life does send roots in to it.
i still wind up with enough to sift and add to my beds

#89066 March 6th, 2007 at 01:13 AM
Joined: Mar 2007
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Mar 2007
One can should be enough for a good start . You may want to later get a second one depending on the size and how fast you fill it . Do not fill it too full as that will make it harder to turn or to allow good airflow .
I also have open air piles on the ground porter57. I have a large area out back that was a dog pen . I keep my piles in there . I have 5 piles right now . One that is just turn, water and cook . One that is ready to add to the garden and 3 that I am adding stuff to all the time . I also have 2 piles of composted cow manuer . One of which has been out there a year and I add a little to the compost as I turn it . One I just gathered from my cousins farm . I gather the dry stuff and let it set , turning when I turn compost for a year so the field seeds die or the birds can feast on them . Then it is used in the piles and I gather more .

#89067 March 19th, 2007 at 03:49 AM
Joined: Mar 2007
Junior Member
Offline
Junior Member
Joined: Mar 2007
I'm doing the can thing right now, first time. Did open piles before. I'll keep yall posted.

Why no bones?

#89068 March 19th, 2007 at 11:44 AM
Joined: Apr 2003
Compost Queen!
Offline
Compost Queen!
Joined: Apr 2003
They can attrack unwanted types of meat eating
critters...

And it can go rancid and spoil, leading to other
unwanted things in the compost pile..

And bones can contain grease and that stuff slows down the composting process...

#89069 March 20th, 2007 at 04:27 PM
Joined: Sep 2004
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Sep 2004
Don't drop the apples in whole. They'll take forever to break down. Better to smash 'em up first. All things will compost faster if they are in smaller pieces. It gives the bacteria a larger suface area to work on. Why don't you eat the apples?


Link Copied to Clipboard
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5
(Release build 20201027)
Responsive Width:

PHP: 7.3.20 Page Time: 0.029s Queries: 41 (0.013s) Memory: 0.7918 MB (Peak: 0.8840 MB) Data Comp: Zlib Server Time: 2021-06-17 06:17:26 UTC
Valid HTML 5 and Valid CSS