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Hardiness

Hardiness of plants describes their ability to survive adverse growing conditions. It is usually limited to discussions of climatic adversity. Thus a plant's ability to tolerate cold, heat, drought, flooding, or wind are typically considered measurements of hardiness.

In temperate latitudes, the term most often describes resistance to cold, or "cold-hardiness," and is generally measured by the lowest temperature a plant can withstand. Hardiness of a plant is usually divided into three categories: tender, half-hardy, and hardy. Tender plants are those killed by freezing temperatures, while hardy plants survive freezing (at least down to certain temperatures, depending on the plant). "Half-hardy" is a term to describe bedding plants which are sown in heat in winter or early spring, and planted outside after all danger of frost has passed.
Posted By Gremelin Posted on May 8th, 2014
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