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#87249 January 10th, 2007 at 01:07 AM
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The title says it all! laugh

I was THRILLED with the success I had with my Clemson Spineless okra last year, and I just got a seed catalog with a burgundy variety, and a thorny variety that is supposed to have huge yields.

So, would it be ok to grow these all together, or will I have to worry about cross polination? The okra area is 2 4x4' raised beds in super south facing sunnyland.

Thanks!! flw

#87250 January 10th, 2007 at 03:47 AM
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It is ok to grow the different kinds..you just could not save seed from them..because yes they would cross pollinate.

The burgundy kind is fun...it is a beautiful burgundy color and turns green when cooked. It has longer skinnier pods then the clemson does. And it does taste the same as the clemson. As for the thorny one, I have never grown it so know nothing about it. I do know that the more space you allow between plants the bigger the plants will grow and the more they will produce. I have a freezer full of frozen okra, gave away tons and still had okra coming on when I pulled my plants in the late fall, I grew clemson. I had a 40 foot row and it grew more then one family could possible eat or freeze.

#87251 January 11th, 2007 at 12:12 AM
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WOW!! A 40' row? That's awesome!!! Duh

#87252 January 11th, 2007 at 01:11 AM
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The seed you saved should keep for another year, so if you wanted to try one of the other kinds...you could just grow the clemson the next year and save seed this year from the new kind. I have tons of seed for the clemson and save seed every year from it...so I always have plenty of it to share if you need some.

#87253 January 11th, 2007 at 12:01 PM
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I grew some of the cajan red last year.I loved it.I'm going to just grow it around the flowers this year.I did have wasp problems near end of season,but it was dry also.They'd hang out on the okra.hard to pick that way.

#87254 January 11th, 2007 at 08:56 PM
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Thanks!! The pod I saved has more than enough seeds, so perhaps I can keep some for '08 too. I really want to see the burgundy! I have to look in my seed catalog, because I dont remember it being called Cajun Red. Maybe there's another variety out there! flw

#87255 January 12th, 2007 at 01:21 AM
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I've never had okra before. What does it taste like and how do you prepare/eat it?

#87256 January 12th, 2007 at 01:44 AM
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John,

Okra can be scary frown , because I has this really unique slimy gooey "juice". It is also full of edible seeds. The closest vegetable I could compare it to is asparagus. It is the famous ingredient in Southern Gumbo. I just serve it simmered in water. My 2 year old LOVES it! It is very very good for you too. It's really neat how it grows. First of all, it's related to hibiscus, so the flowers are beautiful. What surprised me is that the pods grow straight up!

I highly recommend it! clp

#87257 January 12th, 2007 at 12:18 PM
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I only way I like okra is sliced and rolled in flour/cornmeal mix and fried...it needs to be fried until it is almost burnt....It is not slimy when fried enough, as far as taste...I think it has a taste of its own.

Harvesting is a breeze also, I cut the pods...and place whole pods unwashed into a freezer bag and place in the freezer, when I want to fry some, I take out a handful or two and place in a colander and run a little water over it, not enough to thaw it out. I take one pod at a time run a little more water over it and slice it while semi frozen...not slimy, rinse one more time drain and roll in flour and fry.

To save seeds...You allow a pod on the plant to ripen...grow as large as it wants and leave it until the pod is starting to dry a little and is splitting down the sides, you then open the pods and the seeds just roll out...I leave these seeds on a paper plate to dry for a few days and the seed will shrink up when dry enough then store in a closed container or bag in a dry place.

When you want to plant okra seed you should soak your seed in warm water either over night or at least for a few hours to help with germination.

You should thin your okra so that your plants or 10-12" apart. Okra will keep producing as long as you keep it picked until late fall.

#87258 January 12th, 2007 at 10:59 PM
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flower.jpg" alt="[Linked Image]" class="post-image" style="height:auto!important;max-width:100%!important;"/>
Here's a pic of one of my okra flowers last summer!

#87259 January 13th, 2007 at 08:39 AM
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When I pick it I use 'Plastic Sleeves' I have some with elastic on the ends. otherwise wear a long sleeve shirt. Okra will have you itching for days!!!

#87260 January 13th, 2007 at 08:58 AM
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I never had that experience with the Clemson Spineless. But I was only picking a handful every few days! My mind is still trying to grasp a 40' row of anything! frown
flw

#87261 January 13th, 2007 at 09:07 AM
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My orka grows more like trees. Some of the plants get 12 feet tall. I normally have to dig the plants up at the end of the year.

I don't eat it, but the wife loves it. I add it to gombo and I did pickle some year.

#87262 January 13th, 2007 at 09:46 AM
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Cool!! I have 2 jars of hot okra pickles I made.....not sure if I will ever eat them, because they are sooo pretty, with a couple red cayennes and garlic in there!

#87263 January 13th, 2007 at 11:27 AM
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Quote
Originally posted by Amigatec:
When I pick it I use 'Plastic Sleeves' I have some with elastic on the ends. otherwise wear a long sleeve shirt. Okra will have you itching for days!!!
I have never thought about plastic sleeves, But I do always wear a long sleeve shirt when cutting okra...I would also wear gloves, but is hard to cut the okra off the stems with them on for me...So If there is alot to pick, the tops of my hands get beet red and itchy.

#87264 January 13th, 2007 at 08:19 PM
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The Plastic Sleeves are something I brought home from work, not sure where they got them from.

I use a pair of garden shears on mine, Orka is something that has to picked everyday. Once they get over about 4" long they tend to get woody.

#87265 January 15th, 2007 at 05:21 AM
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My favorite way of fixing okra is with tomatoes and onions. The way my Mother has my whole life. Then fried is next. I also like pickled okra.
It is something that has never caused me to itch and I wear nothing and just use a sharp pocket knife to cut it off with. And that kinda surprises me as I'm allergic to most things. Yes it needs to be picked at least every two days. I can't imagine a garden without it. Kinda like no tomatoes in a garden. Jay

#87266 January 15th, 2007 at 08:37 AM
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LOL I just noticed that all of you are from the So uth....except for John in CT, who has never had okra! Seriously, noone that I know would think to grow it here. On some of my baby boards, when people ask for advice on veggies their toddlers will eat, I always suggest okra, and the usual reply is " EW! GROSS!" laugh

Well, after all this, I think Ive decided to stick with my Clemson spineless from last year's plants seeds.

#87267 January 15th, 2007 at 09:31 AM
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Orka was brought to this country with the slaves from Africa, it grows better with a lot of heat. That is why it is much more common in the south.

Mine grows better from July on.

Now if only somebody would develop a version of Rhubarb that will grow in the south......

#87268 January 16th, 2007 at 12:28 AM
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If you will add a little vinegar to the water in which you boil your okra it will not be Slimy!

#87269 January 16th, 2007 at 11:43 AM
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Amigatec,
I agree. I don't plant here till the days start nearing 90. Then it really grows when it hits 100 and everything else stops. Definately a heat lover. And when the temps. get cool mine usually grinds to a halt. Clemsom spineless is my favorite after trying several of the other varieties. Jay

#87270 January 16th, 2007 at 12:10 PM
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We had fried okra for dinner tonight. Why can't we plant seeds if they cross pollinate? I always plant more than one type in the same garden but I've never saved the seeds. Won't they grow?

#87271 January 16th, 2007 at 09:16 PM
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I guess if you would save the seeds, they wouldnt grow true to the original plants because of the cross pollination.

#87272 January 16th, 2007 at 11:47 PM
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might be a good project. As long as they taste good.....

#87273 January 17th, 2007 at 01:06 AM
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Quote
Originally posted by Amigatec:
Now if only somebody would develop a version of Rhubarb that will grow in the south......
Hey Pat there is a type of rhubarb that grows from seed to harvest the same year and grows well here in Arkansas, I'll do some checking and find the name of it for you.

Here's the name and a few places that have the seed:
Glaskin"s Perpetual Rhubarb

Bountiful Gardens
Territorial seed
Heirloom Acres Seed

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