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#83388 March 15th, 2007 at 03:43 PM
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Has anyone grown melons (cantelope) from seeds they took from a melon? Do they need to be prepared in any way prior to planting, and will they stand any chance of growing?

#83389 March 15th, 2007 at 04:09 PM
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Cantalopes are easy to grow from seed (I direct seed mine). If you get your seed from a hybrid melon, the plant probably won't come back true--it will likely revert to one of the parent melons that was used in the hybridization process. If the melon is an heirloom, it probably is not a hybrid and you will be fine. As I said, melons are easy. Work up hills with lots of cow manure, compost, or whatever you choose. Level the top and plant 6 to 8 seeds per mound. I like to mulch heavily a good way out from each mound with wheat straw so the melons won't make contact with the soil which can cause rot. When the plants have put on their first true leaves, thin to the best four. About halfway through the season, side dress them with more compost/manure. Keep them well watered and they should reward you with lots of yummy melons!

#83390 March 15th, 2007 at 04:17 PM
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can you start the seeds inside ahead of time? how long does it take (# of days) before the fruit will be ripe and ready to pick?

#83391 March 15th, 2007 at 04:31 PM
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Yes you can start the seeds indoors...But this should not be done until about 3 weeks before the set out time. Use a peat pot or cup that can be torn away, as they do not like to have their roots disturbed when planted outdoors. The outside temperature needs to be at least 55 or above at night before setting outdoors. Depending on the kind you are growing it can take between 70-90 days to produce ripe fruit.

#83392 March 15th, 2007 at 10:46 PM
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k. thanks!!

#83393 March 16th, 2007 at 03:21 PM
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Thanks for info, will try

#83394 March 16th, 2007 at 09:55 PM
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Do you know that I even left out a
cantaloupe that I grew one year ousside
over winter...
It decomposed down..
And sprouted about 50 plants,
almost all in the same hole..
or within inches of each other...

They are very easy to direct seed..

The only problem I had with them was
the woodchucks/rabbits ate everything on me...

#83395 March 23rd, 2007 at 03:03 AM
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My family of two adults and one 3 year old are trying to grow cantalope this year. I planted 6 seeds in peat pots and now I have all 6 coming up! I think I have too many plants for just us. How many melons will I get from one plant? I may give some away, I only have so much room in my garden. But before I do, I was just wondering...

#83396 March 23rd, 2007 at 03:17 AM
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Well there are only two adults here, and I plant 3 large hills with 3 plants per hill. And it seems that during a two week period when they start ripening....You end up with more melons then you can eat, but we manage and don't usually end up giving any away. Each variety produces differently so to say how many each vine would produce would be impossible, it also depends on soil, moisture and weather.

#83397 March 23rd, 2007 at 03:26 AM
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I would also say, it depends if you've got the right growing conditions, and the plant is happy or overly~happy or just barely growing...

The right growing conditions are not only what they're planted in
*ie: soil/dirt* but heat or rain or humidity... *or wood chucks! :p *

#83398 March 23rd, 2007 at 03:51 AM
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Quote
Originally posted by weezie13:
... *or wood chucks! :p *
I knew you were going to say that weezie laugh laugh I might also add or turtles, which is what got a few of mine last summer.

#83399 March 23rd, 2007 at 05:45 AM
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interesting. Well i don't know how well i will do since this is my first veggie garden. But I plan to keep on top of it. Lots of sun here in Oklahoma!

#83400 March 23rd, 2007 at 01:50 PM
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For problems with any small rodents, try putting out a plastic owl. If you don't have a fence to stick it on, try fixing a post in the ground to perch it on. If possible, move it every now and then to make it look realistic. The little beggars aren't likely to come stealing your stuff if they think they will become lunch for the owl, lol.

#83401 March 23rd, 2007 at 02:42 PM
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My biggest problem is the neighbor down the street's dog backing up and crapping on top of my plants!!!!!! But this is the flower garden out front not the veggie garden in back!

#83402 March 23rd, 2007 at 10:12 PM
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Go to Dollar General or some other bargain store and buy a BIG can of black pepper and sprinkle it liberally all around your flowers. When I lived in Arkansas, one of the neighbors dogs kept getting in my trash--the pepper put a stop to that and I got the fun of watching him get a good snootful laugh clp

#83403 March 24th, 2007 at 02:19 PM
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HA HA!!!!

#83404 March 24th, 2007 at 03:29 PM
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And don't put any products on top of the soil like Bone Meal or Blood Meal...
*which are verrrrrrrrrry good organic fertilizers, but need to be well incorporated into the lower soils, and kept away from the top layers* because any animal that eats meat will be drawn to it.... by smell...

#83405 March 24th, 2007 at 09:05 PM
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