This set of forums is an archive of our old CGI-Based forum platform (UBB.Classic) that was never imported to our current forum (UBB.threads); as such, no new postings or registrations are allowed here.

Please instead direct all questions and postings to the our current forum here.
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
#74057 November 18th, 2006 at 01:48 AM
Joined: May 2006
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: May 2006
Since not everyone visits the plants and flowers forum, I thought I'd post a link to the thread that I started over there. I'm just wondering what methods/programs everyone uses for planning their gardens? What, if anything, have you found that doesn't work or you wouldn't recommend.
Garden Planning

Thanks!
Sarah

#74058 November 18th, 2006 at 02:07 AM
Joined: Apr 2006
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Apr 2006
Sarah,
Thanks for putting this link in the Fruit/Veggie section. I am one who wouldn't have seen it otherwise, but now I'll keep an eye on it.

#74059 November 18th, 2006 at 05:15 AM
Joined: Jul 2005
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Jul 2005
For veggie gardens....I use the graph paper method and that works really well, after I figure space and plants I hang it on the wall, so I can refer back to it as needed...Last years is still hanging on the wall and will be replaced soon with 2007 growing chart for my veggie garden. I usually tape several sheets of graph paper together so each square represents 1 square foot to make it easy, so far it has been fail proof...and I have been doing it this way for years. Once in awhile I do end up with some space left over in the garden my garden is 50'x50'...but is not exactly square if you use the fence around it you end up with alittle more space then you chart for, but that is never a problem, I can always find something to add in that space.

#74060 November 18th, 2006 at 05:34 AM
Joined: Feb 2006
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Feb 2006
That sounds good, Comfrey. I'm only a container gardener who is dreaming of a real garden.
I'm curious as to how many plants, such as a tomato, go in the one square foot of ground?
Like, do you plant one per foot, or 2 if it's a small plant such as a pepper, or what?

#74061 November 18th, 2006 at 09:00 AM
Joined: Jun 2006
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Jun 2006
My garden planning has morphed a bit over time. For the most part, I follow the squarefoot gardening guidelines and spacings. As a rule of thumb, that's a really good starting point for small plot planning. The trick for us year round gardeners though is with succession planning. Having a bunch of space going bare can be a huge disappointment.

With limited space it's a good idea to always have something waiting in the wings. And with SQFG another thing to consider is "tweeners." These are things that you can "shoehorn" in to fill up any gaps or shady places. Lettuce, garlic, bunching onions and small carrots such as "short 'n sweet" make for great tweeners.

A good plan for small plot gardens also includes crops that can do double or triple duty. For example, beet tops can serve as salad greens as they mature, and eventually will be harvested for their roots. Nasturtiums are attractive flowers that are also very good in salads, as are the leaves.

plant what you like, plant something new, experiment, and have fun. smile

#74062 November 18th, 2006 at 11:31 AM
Joined: Jul 2005
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Jul 2005
Quote
Originally posted by Deborah L.:
That sounds good, Comfrey. I'm only a container gardener who is dreaming of a real garden.
I'm curious as to how many plants, such as a tomato, go in the one square foot of ground?
Like, do you plant one per foot, or 2 if it's a small plant such as a pepper, or what?
The tomato plants I grow require alot of space..each plant is given 2 square feet growing area and I allow 1-2' between the plants, that way I have room for cages/stakes and room to be able to pick and work with my plants alittle better, Now for peppers, I probable crowd them alittle, but I space the plants 1' apart, and yes I do measure when I set my plants out...I have a wooden fold up type measurer thing, one of hubby's throw aways, part of it is broke off, but there is still enough to work perfect for my needs, and it fits nicely into my garden bucket that has my hand tools, hose nozzles, garden ties, hammer, scissors & a regular roll up tape measure, string & who knows what else might be in the bottom. Now for okra...I thin it out to about 6-8" between plants, the more space you give each plant the larger the plant will be and the more productive it will be also, so crowding somethings is not a good thing, and other things can still be very productive crowded up.

#74063 November 18th, 2006 at 12:59 PM
Joined: Feb 2006
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Feb 2006
Thanks.
What plants can be crowded up and still be very productive?

#74064 November 18th, 2006 at 10:24 PM
Joined: Jul 2006
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Jul 2006
Hi Deborah,
I grow salad, lettuce, spring onions, radish, beets,tomaoes, and carrots. they all grow well in small spaces. wavey wavey


Link Copied to Clipboard
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5
(Release build 20201027)
Responsive Width:

PHP: 7.3.20 Page Time: 0.024s Queries: 29 (0.014s) Memory: 0.7615 MB (Peak: 0.8354 MB) Data Comp: Zlib Server Time: 2021-05-11 20:54:46 UTC
Valid HTML 5 and Valid CSS