This set of forums is an archive of our old CGI-Based forum platform (UBB.Classic) that was never imported to our current forum (UBB.threads); as such, no new postings or registrations are allowed here.

Please instead direct all questions and postings to the our current forum here.
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
#67921 October 17th, 2006 at 08:50 AM
Joined: Jul 2006
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: Jul 2006
I was digging everything out in the garden today, moving dirt from here to there, I struck roots. At first it wasn't to bad, but as I kept going the really took over the ground where everything was. Could these roots effect the way everything grows? If I pull some of the smaller ones out (by accident) withh it effect the tree itself? It's a pine tree... only 12 years or so old.

Thanks! thumbup

#67922 October 17th, 2006 at 10:36 AM
A
Anonymous
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered
A
depends on how close you cut the roots back. pines usually have a pretty good tap root (the center root that goes straight down for water) so trimming part of the horizontal roots won't be too back. just try not to cut the roots closer than 2-3 feet from the trunk, and if possible, even leave them to the "drip line" of the tree.

#67923 October 18th, 2006 at 08:59 AM
Joined: Jul 2006
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: Jul 2006
Thanks, Jiffy! I didn't plan to get too close to the tree anyway, so this works out just fine!

#67924 October 18th, 2006 at 08:08 PM
Joined: Aug 2005
J
Member
Offline
Member
J
Joined: Aug 2005
It certainly will affect everything growing there as the pine tree will absorb much of the water and nutrients from the soil where the roots are. Your plants will be competing with the tree for needed nutrients and water. tree roots extend out as much as three times farther then the diameter of the tree's dripline. They really don't have a "taproot". Most plants don't. Their root systems are located mostly in the top couple feet of soil where most of the water and nutrients come from. You really won't hurt a mature tree by taking out some of the roots, but the tree will relentlessly continue to send roots out into your planting bed. When a root is cut, say with a shovel, it will begin to branch out at the cut.

This is not to say that your plants cannot sustain themselves in the shadow of a large tree. The tree will not take ALL nutrients, but you can make it easier on them by making up for the lack of nutrients with more fertilizer or compost.

#67925 October 19th, 2006 at 09:00 AM
A
Anonymous
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered
A
john, i respectfully differ with you. depending on the type of tree, they can, and do have "tap roots". several types of pines will have a tap root, and i have seen types of pines that the roots are nearly as deep as the tree is tall. in fact, when clearing land, i have seen roots that could be mistaken for logs!

as for the roots affecting the beds, generally, if a pine trees roots are systematically removed from a particular area, they will spread back out, but at a deeper level, giving the bed the upper 18 inches or so of soil for the flowers.

#67926 October 19th, 2006 at 09:17 AM
Joined: Jul 2006
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: Jul 2006
thumbup

Quote
upper 18 inches or so of soil for the flowers.
That's more then enough "free" soil... I don't plan to dig that deep, only 8-10 inches.
I'll just wind up cutting the roots that are spreading a bit past the dripline back. No major roots-I hope! laugh

#67927 October 19th, 2006 at 07:19 PM
Joined: Aug 2005
J
Member
Offline
Member
J
Joined: Aug 2005
Mark, you believe what you want. Most trees do not have "tap roots". Tap roots are generally a myth. You can do a quick google search and read the multitude of university research articles on the subject of tree root systems and verify it for yourself. Use advice you get in gardening forums as a stepping stone to do your own due diligence. Here are a couple of links I have bookmarked that I think relate to the subject...


http://www.ipm.iastate.edu/ipm/hortnews/1992/4-1-1992/treeroot.html

http://www.ext.colostate.edu/PUBS/Garden/02926.html

http://www.forestry.gov.uk/pdf/fcin078.pdf//fcin078.pdf

#67928 October 19th, 2006 at 09:35 PM
Joined: Mar 2005
T
Official Blabber Mouth
Offline
Official Blabber Mouth
T
Joined: Mar 2005
I know that my evergreen sport has a taproot. One that is deeper than the bush is tall, but it doesn't do the small feeder roots just really fat sideways roots that it sends out to start more plants. I love that little guy.

#67929 October 20th, 2006 at 12:17 PM
Joined: Feb 2004
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Feb 2004
"Tap Root" sounds like it would make a great name for a beer.

Much of our area has enough rain for trees to root fairly shallow.

Usually it depends on the depth of the soil and how deep available water it.

I find it amazing how trees will grow on the sides of a rock like Beacon Rock in Washington.

But they only get so-old there, as they often grow beyond the limits of the water available in the limited soil between the crags.


Link Copied to Clipboard
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5
(Release build 20201027)
Responsive Width:

PHP: 7.3.20 Page Time: 0.015s Queries: 31 (0.008s) Memory: 0.7638 MB (Peak: 0.8377 MB) Data Comp: Zlib Server Time: 2021-06-15 22:10:09 UTC
Valid HTML 5 and Valid CSS