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#64996 October 8th, 2006 at 04:39 AM
Joined: Oct 2006
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What are the proper steps for clipping and potting-to-seedling for replant of Confederate Jasmine? And is there a good survival rate for the plant? I am a rank novice at this and sit here totally ignorant.
Ben

#64997 October 8th, 2006 at 09:34 PM
Joined: Mar 2005
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I found this information on the web. Maybe it will help you.

CONFEDERATE JASMINE
Confederate jasmine or star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides) is highly prized for its heavily scented clusters of phlox-like flowers, which bloom on twining stems in spring and summer. It is hardy in Central and Coastal South Carolina, but tender in the Piedmont.

Mature Height/Spread: When supported, this twining vine reaches up to 20 feet. Without support and with some tip-pinching, it is a spreading shrub or groundcover, 1˝ to 2 feet tall and 4 to 5 feet wide. The new leaves are glossy light green and the mature leaves are a lustrous dark green, to 3 inches long. The 1-inch white flowers appear in small clusters on short side branches and they are attractive to bees.

Growth Rate: This is a moderate to fast growing plant.

Landscape Use: Outdoors, Confederate jasmine can frame porches, accent trellises or, screen fences and walls, or be used as a groundcover. Indoors, the vine will spill over the edges of hanging containers, or it can be trained on a small trellis.

Cultivation: Confederate jasmine prefers sun to partial shade. A moist but well-drained soil to which leaf mold has been added is best. Yellowish leaves indicate the need for fertilizer, which should be applied in spring. Tie the stems to a fairly heavy support. The vine won’t climb masonry. Pinch the tips to stimulate lateral growth and prune after flowering if necessary to restrain growth. If the vine is grown as a groundcover, trim the upward-twining stems. Additional plants can be propagated from stem cuttings.

Indoors, Confederate jasmine grows best in bright indirect or curtain-filtered sunlight except in winter, when they need at least four hours of direct sunlight a day. Night temperatures of 50 to 55 ° F and day temperatures of 68 to 72 ° F are ideal.

Cultivars: ‘Madison’ has superior hardiness and is recommended for the Upstate.

Problems: Confederate jasmine is relatively problem- free. Rabbits like to graze on this plant


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