This set of forums is an archive of our old CGI-Based forum platform (UBB.Classic) that was never imported to our current forum (UBB.threads); as such, no new postings or registrations are allowed here.

Please instead direct all questions and postings to the our current forum here.
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
#64509 September 24th, 2006 at 09:39 PM
Joined: Sep 2006
P
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
P
Joined: Sep 2006
Hi,
I planted a Wisteria from whip stock 2 years ago. It has grown to epic proportions on a sturdy trellis but it has yet to bloom. When should it be pruned, how much and will that encourage it to bloom? Duh

#64510 September 24th, 2006 at 09:56 PM
Joined: Jul 2006
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Jul 2006
wisteria should be pruned twice a year--fall and mid-winter, cutting back all the side-shoot growth a few inches or so. this will ensure plenty of flower buds, and keep the plant under control.

Hope this helps a bit! thumbup

#64511 September 25th, 2006 at 01:38 AM
Joined: Oct 2005
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Oct 2005
Wisteria can take 5 - 10 years to bloom, even if you are pruning as Mark suggested and it's planted in ideal conditions. Plus, too much pruning of a young Wisteria can result in cutting off the next years flower buds. I prune mine in late July, early August just to get it under control and shaped the way I want it.

The following is information taken from the Michigan State University website:

Considerable confusion exists about pruning wisteria. The
two species most commonly grown are Wisteria floribunda
(Japanese wisteria) and Wisteria sinensis (Chinese
wisteria), both of which bloom before or with the
unfolding of the leaves.

Pruning wisteria extensively during the dormant season may
encourage rampant vegetative growth the next spring.
Instead, in July prune out the long, straggly growth
except those branches needed for climbing. This is more
likely than anything else to induce flowering. Shoots
should be cut back one-third to one-half their length.
This will induce them to produce the short spurs that will
bear next season's flower clusters.

Wisterias are normally vines, but pruning can make them
take shrubby and/or weeping forms. Heading back young
shoots holds the height at a definite point and after
several years, the plant produces a trunk-like stem. Then
leaders can be allowed to droop to the ground.

Wisteria will bloom abundantly if planted in good garden
loam with full sun, watered well the first growing season
and pruned in the summer.

#64512 September 25th, 2006 at 04:52 AM
Joined: Sep 2006
P
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
P
Joined: Sep 2006
First, thank you both Mark and Rosie for your replies.

Since August is long past, I will prune according to Mark's suggestion for now. This Wisteria has taken on life with a vengence and is truely out of bounds. I think I will take before and after pictures!

#64513 September 25th, 2006 at 05:10 AM
Joined: Jul 2006
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Jul 2006
Quote
I think I will take before and after pictures!
sounds great! thumbup
I'll be looking for it!

#64514 September 28th, 2006 at 04:59 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Feb 2004
In college, the instructor recommended to reduce the number of buds by thinning or shortening, to increase the length / size of flowers clusters.

You will have choices eventually: plenty of flowers, or fewer that are bigger.


Link Copied to Clipboard
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5
(Release build 20201027)
Responsive Width:

PHP: 7.3.20 Page Time: 0.012s Queries: 25 (0.006s) Memory: 0.7467 MB (Peak: 0.8046 MB) Data Comp: Zlib Server Time: 2021-06-15 22:23:01 UTC
Valid HTML 5 and Valid CSS