This set of forums is an archive of our old CGI-Based forum platform (UBB.Classic) that was never imported to our current forum (UBB.threads); as such, no new postings or registrations are allowed here.

Please instead direct all questions and postings to the our current forum here.
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
#51391 November 10th, 2006 at 09:38 AM
Joined: May 2006
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: May 2006
I got some four o'clocks in a trade and immediately planted them, way back in July or August. They are only about 4-5 inches tall and I was just wondering what I should do to take care of them over the winter? They are right now in a pseudo-greenhouse (emphasis on pseudo), but it will definately cool off out there once we get real cold weather. Any suggestions?

#51392 November 10th, 2006 at 11:22 AM
Joined: Aug 2003
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Aug 2003
I don't know that the plants will actually overwinter if the get that cold. Are they in pots?

#51393 November 10th, 2006 at 10:23 PM
Joined: May 2006
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: May 2006
Yeah, they are in pots. I was just bored when I planted them, didn't really think about what I'd do if they grew. Bringing them in the house wouldn't be a problem but would they grow over the winter?

#51394 November 11th, 2006 at 12:02 AM
Joined: Aug 2002
A
Member
Offline
Member
A
Joined: Aug 2002
4 O'Clocks make tubers, sort of like dahlias, so you might try simply overwintering the tubers wrapped in paper or stored in peat. You could also try bringing them inside, but I don't know how well they would grow in the house...however, as long as the tubers are "alive" they would regrow next year.

#51395 November 11th, 2006 at 12:20 AM
Joined: May 2006
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: May 2006
Should I just let the plants naturally die back, then dig up the tuber? Would the tuber need to be dried or left moist before putting in paper/peat? I'm sorry, I'm new to gardening and am very uninformed.

#51396 November 11th, 2006 at 06:30 AM
Joined: Aug 2002
A
Member
Offline
Member
A
Joined: Aug 2002
You don't have to wait for them to die back...you can cut off the foliage and dig up the tubers. Let them dry out or they may rot. I'm in zone 6b/7a and I leave mine in the ground. You might be able to overwinter them in the ground in your zone if you plant in an area with good grainage and cover with 3 or 4 inches of mulch. Don't fret if they don't make it. There are plenty of people on this site who'd be glad to send you more seeds.

#51397 November 12th, 2006 at 12:39 AM
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Jul 2003
He's right,they could overwinter,you'd want to be sure the area drained well,but with them already being in pots could just move the pot. I started a seed last year was suppose to be soloman colored.was near end of season.so the pot actually went through a winter-sowing stage.It came through.it had already started to form its tuber that fall.With your shorter season your tubers would bloom slower versis doing the seeds yearly as an annual.you could wintersow your seeds.I have them mass planted in areas throughout the yard,so no tuber or seed shortage here.I have fushia,pink,dirty pink,yellow& white.I also got a white with pink speckles& a yellow with pink splashes.

#51398 November 14th, 2006 at 12:09 AM
Joined: May 2006
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: May 2006
How about if I snip the leaves down, don't water, and just set them out on my breezeway? It doesn't get really cold out there, probably around freezing or so. What do you guys think?

#51399 November 17th, 2006 at 02:09 AM
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Jul 2003
they should be fine.I think its the freezeing ground thats would zap them.

#51400 November 17th, 2006 at 10:11 PM
Joined: May 2006
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: May 2006
Great! Thanks!

#51401 December 9th, 2006 at 11:54 PM
Joined: Mar 2006
V
Member
Offline
Member
V
Joined: Mar 2006
4 O'clocks will MAY make it through a zone 5 mild winter in the ground. The tubers are hardy to about 10 degrees. You might want to dig up the tubers and store just above freezing. Dry them out for a few hours; brush off the soil and store in a brown paper bag in an unheated basement or fridge, ect.
I'm in zone 5b-6a and tempertures often fall below 10 degrees so I wouldn't chance it.


Link Copied to Clipboard
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5
(Release build 20201027)
Responsive Width:

PHP: 7.3.20 Page Time: 0.021s Queries: 35 (0.012s) Memory: 0.7719 MB (Peak: 0.8468 MB) Data Comp: Zlib Server Time: 2021-03-06 23:07:20 UTC
Valid HTML 5 and Valid CSS