This set of forums is an archive of our old CGI-Based forum platform (UBB.Classic) that was never imported to our current forum (UBB.threads); as such, no new postings or registrations are allowed here.

Please instead direct all questions and postings to the our current forum here.
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
#29691 May 15th, 2005 at 08:49 PM
Joined: May 2005
hinda Offline OP
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: May 2005
i am very new at this gardening bit but i am very eager to have a beautiful garden. i wanted to try and gro a pear tree from seeds of pears after we ate them. how can i doo this. do the seed need special preparation? should the seeds be planted close to the top or dug furhter down? does it need to be heavily watered? how soon should i expect results. i unfortuntely dont even know what kind of pears these are. they are small green pears that i buy in the local store - keep in mind that i live in isrel
thanx
hinda wavey

#29692 May 15th, 2005 at 09:11 PM
A
Anonymous
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered
A
wavey hi hinda! welcome... i don't have your answer, but wanted to say hi.

#29693 May 15th, 2005 at 11:38 PM
Joined: Mar 2005
T
Official Blabber Mouth
Offline
Official Blabber Mouth
T
Joined: Mar 2005
Some pears require cross pollination so you would need two different sorts of pears inorder to get fruit. And I'm afraid I don't know anything about their growing requirements. But if you only have about 8 weeks of growing season that may not be enough time for them to fruit. I have been reading up on your area as you can see. The ones you have may be a hybrid that is special to your area in which case you are going to have to find out that varieties name.

#29694 May 20th, 2005 at 05:17 PM
Joined: Apr 2004
O
Member
Offline
Member
O
Joined: Apr 2004
Pear trees definitely benefit from cross-pollination.

seeds of fruit trees produce seedlings of varying quality, most of which will not be as good as the parents. Also, seedling trees would grow into full sized "standard" trees which would require tending with ladders and lots of climbing.

I would recommend buying a named variety of pear tree on a dwarfing rootstock. You would know what you were getting and being dwarf makes the care of the trees so much easier.

This of course would also depend on whether or not pears are suited to your climate. Pears and apples are more suited to temperate regions. You are probably hot and dry. There may be certain varieties that would be acceptable, however. I would do some research on this before attempting it.

Having said all this, I have a friend who is nursing a small apple seedling. Simply for the fun of experimentation, you could plant some seeds in small pots or probably a cell pack would be better. The seeds will need a 2-3 month period to encourage germination. Place them in a little moist sand or potting soil in the refrigerator and then plant them in a cell pack after 3 months or so.

One more thought, pear and apple trees need a certain amount of cold weather to stimulate bloom and fruit set. Certain varieties require less of a cool period than others, but if they don't receive enough cold temperatures, they will never fruit.


Link Copied to Clipboard
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5
(Release build 20201027)
Responsive Width:

PHP: 7.3.20 Page Time: 0.017s Queries: 21 (0.011s) Memory: 0.7360 MB (Peak: 0.7916 MB) Data Comp: Zlib Server Time: 2021-04-23 02:45:57 UTC
Valid HTML 5 and Valid CSS