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#27990 June 4th, 2005 at 06:03 PM
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Jillian Offline OP
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Hello smile New member, here. My name is Jillian, and it's nice to meet you. It was suggested that I bring this question to the House plants forum...

I have a young aloe vera plant that I purchased a week ago from a Lowe's store. It's about 5"-6" tall and it was in a teeny pot, very root bound and dry when I bought it. My daughter & I transplanted it into a larger pot (4") the day after it was purchased and watered it just a little bit.

The other day I noticed that one of the bottom leaves was turning a lighter shade of green; it is limp, loose, and beginning to turn a more sickly shade of green. This leaf is the only one that has a cut from the tip, (it was like that when we bought it). I keep the plant in a high-light area of my house - near the patio door - where it receives direct morning sun, and then for the rest of the day it's in bright, indirect, natural light.

My question (finally) is, do I pull this sickly leaf off? I don't know if it's causing harm to the rest of the plant. Do I cut it off or just pull it off - it's so loose - but I don't want to cause trauma to it.

Thanks so much for any help you can give to me smile I look forward to hearing from you.

- Jillian flw

#27991 June 4th, 2005 at 07:03 PM
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Hi Jillian,

One damaged leaf is not a cause for concern. If your Aloe will look better without the leaf, then cut it off where it attaches to the rest of the plant. Otherwise, you can leave it on without harm to the plant. It probably will gradually deteriorate on its own and not recover.

#27992 June 5th, 2005 at 03:13 PM
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Hi Will,

Thanks so much for that advice. I think I will go ahead and leave it alone and see what happens. I don't think the leaf is going to make it by itself, but if it doesn't then I'll just remove it.

Thank you again smile
- Jillian

#27993 June 7th, 2005 at 04:00 AM
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You can give it a tug too. All my bottom leaves that fall off come off quite easily if they're soft and floppy like what you're describing with yours. So ya, if you don't feel like taking scissors to it, you can do that ^.^

~Phoebe

#27994 June 7th, 2005 at 01:12 PM
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Jillian Offline OP
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Hi Phoebe smile Yep, I got brave this morning (finally) and pulled it off. The rest of the plant is looking terrific and the soil is as dry as can be. I'm going to look into getting a soil probe, as mentioned by another member because, man, I need all the assistance I can get! smile

Thanks much for your advice; it is good to meet you!

- Jillian

#27995 June 8th, 2005 at 04:10 AM
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Hi Jillian,

If the probe you referred to is a moisture meter, I strongly advise against it. They are notoriously inaccurate. If the probe is a Soil Sleuth, then I do recommend it.

#27996 June 8th, 2005 at 02:52 PM
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Jillian Offline OP
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Hi Will,

From what I can recall, the probe that my brother used too many years ago to mention was a moisture meter. Where can I find a Soil Sleuth? I have never heard of it; how does it work?

Thanks for your help. smile

-Jillian

#27997 June 9th, 2005 at 03:24 AM
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Hi Jillian,

Go to http://soilsleuth.com/. It has all the information you need and you can order it from that site.

It is a way of retrieving bits of soil from various depths in the pot to determine just how moist it is. This is particularly effective with larger plants and those with compacted soil where it is hard to poke your finger in very far. It also saves nice fingernails!

I have three basic tools when I work professionally - pruning scissors, a feather duster, and a soil sleuth.

#27998 June 9th, 2005 at 03:29 AM
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Quote
a feather duster, and a soil sleuth
Will, you have a dream job! grinnnn

#27999 June 9th, 2005 at 04:09 AM
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You're right, Cricket. I do.

#28000 June 9th, 2005 at 07:45 AM
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Will, the soil sleuth is a great idea! Thanks for posting the link.

How does the soil sleuth hold up to frequent use?

#28001 June 10th, 2005 at 02:09 AM
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Hi Cricket,

The soil sleuth is made of rigid plastic and is nearly indestructible. I have misplaced mine once or twice, but I have never had to replace it for reasons of overuse.

Will

#28002 June 10th, 2005 at 01:53 PM
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Is it alright to use a plant food on an Aloe? I have those little Miracle grow plant food sticks that go right into to the soil. Do you think they are ok to use or should I just let it be.

#28003 June 10th, 2005 at 04:36 PM
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When they are not dormant it's ok. I've heard those plant sticks cause hot spots though. So I'm not sure about those.


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