This set of forums is an archive of our old CGI-Based forum platform (UBB.Classic) that was never imported to our current forum (UBB.threads); as such, no new postings or registrations are allowed here.

Please instead direct all questions and postings to the our current forum here.
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3
Crochet 101 #124540
August 8th, 2005 at 02:54 AM
August 8th, 2005 at 02:54 AM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Hi everyone ~ wavey

I thought I'd start a new thread for us on the topic of crocheting. This first post is just a copy of the one I did in the Baby Blanket thread explaining about types of crochet Hooks.

Perhaps Mary Reboakly will also copy her post about crochet pattern abbreviations here as well so we can have everything in one place.

I'm hoping a thread like this will be helpful so everyone can jump in with questions, comments or further clarifications as we go along. Don't be shy!

A general word about HOOKS for crochet....

ALUMINUM HOOKS are labeled with a letter and a milimeter indication. As in Lynne's hook, she wrote that it is an H/5 mm hook.

With aluminum hooks, the HIGHER the letter, the LARGER the hook. So an H or a J are much bigger hooks than a C or an E. The larger the hook, the heavier the yarn you can use it with. And the bulkier the piece will be. A big hook with a more medium weight yarn will give a loosely woven or loopy appearance.

Aluminum hooks are the ones you most commonly see used for garments, blankets, and decorative projects.


STEEL HOOKS are numbered. With steel hooks the HIGHER the number, the SMALLER the hook.

So a Steel Hook 7/1.5mm is LARGER than a Steel Hook 9/1.25mm

Steel hooks are the type used for doilies, lacy work, collars and cuffs, fancy edgings, etc.

Utilizing thread, rather than yarn, these hooks makes very delicate work indeed.

The threads for steel hook come in an assortment of thicknesses. A 10 thread is heavier than a 20 and a 20 is heavier than a 50. The finer the thread, the smaller your hook should be, generally speaking.

Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124541
August 8th, 2005 at 03:04 AM
August 8th, 2005 at 03:04 AM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Hi again ~ wavey

Let's have a brief word about the language of crochet so that we all know we are talking about the same thing.

For instance...

The vertical part of any stitch is called a "POST".

The horizontal part on top is called a "LOOP".

If you look at a crocheted stitch, you will notice the LOOP has two sides. The one nearest you is called the "FRONT LOOP". The one furthest from you is called the "BACK LOOP". And yes, it really makes a difference which one you use or if you use both simultaneously.

If you have a crocheted piece where there is some distance between stitches, as in a Granny Square, for instance, or a lacy piece, the area between the stitches is called a "SPACE". (There really shouldn't be any "holes" in your work! laugh )

When working a flat piece of any kind whether or not you are going back and forth from end to end or cutting the yarn and starting again at the beginning, the line of stitches you put in are called a "ROW".

When working something in a circle, the line of stitches are called a "ROUND".

The tool used for crochet is called a "HOOK". Notice it has a notched end. (The tool for knitting is called a "NEEDLE"; it has a smooth, pointed end.)

When you wrap the yarn or thread around the end of the hook before or after inserting it into a loop, that wrapping is called "YARN OVER" and is abbreviated y/o.


Make sense?

Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124542
August 8th, 2005 at 03:22 AM
August 8th, 2005 at 03:22 AM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Hi again ~ wavey

About reading patterns....

If you are not already, try to get familiar with the list of abbreviations Mary Reboakly posted in the other thread. That's a good first step to understanding pattern instructions.

Next are the little oddities modern pattern writers use to save time and space so they don't have to write out every single stitch you must do.

Some stitch sequences that you must repeat are put into parenthesis, thus: (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) and then the number of times you must repeat that sequence is written after, thus: (2 dc,ch 1,2 dc)2 times.

If the instructions were to write each stitch separately for you, it would be really hard to follow the total pattern and not to mention how long each pattern would be printed out! Using the example I gave above, without the parenthesis, it would have to be: 2 dc,ch 1,2 dc,2 dc,ch 1,2 dc, 2 dc,ch 1, 2 dc.

Hard to follow that, isn't it!

Another way instructions will indicate repeats is with the use of * and **

Reading along in a pattern, you might see something like this:

Ch 2, 3 dc, (ch 2, 3 dc, sc) 4 times; *ch 2, 6 dc, ch 3, 5 dc** repeat from * to ** all the way across to end of row.

So you would first do the Ch 2, 3 dc, followed by the four repeats of Ch 2, 3 dc, sc. Next you would keep repeating ch 2, 6 dc, ch 3, 5 dc until you got to the end.

And by the way, where you are in the repeat when you reach the end should match where the instructions say you should be!

Sometimes it will give the repeat for * to ** and then say "continue until last five stitches from end, then... And will give the final sequence for the row or round.

Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124543
August 8th, 2005 at 03:23 AM
August 8th, 2005 at 03:23 AM
Joined: Aug 2004
Washington, the state that is....
Triss Offline
Member
Triss  Offline
Member

Joined: Aug 2004
Washington, the state that is....
Love all that stuff. I am taking notes! I dont know the names of anything and this is great for me!


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
We are all under the same stars... therefore we are never far apart.
Re: Crochet 101 #124544
August 8th, 2005 at 03:31 AM
August 8th, 2005 at 03:31 AM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Hi ~ wavey

Here is a simple variation of the Granny Square some of you might like to try. It has 6 sides instead of 4 and is made in only two rounds.

It's finished size is approximately 3 inches across when worked with worsted weight yarn and a G Hook.

By the way, a single Granny Square all by itself is usually called a "MOTIF".

Motifs can be connected together in almost limitless ways to shape many projects. They can also be adjusted for size by varying the yarn weight and the hook size as well as the number of rounds added.

So here's the pattern to try:

Ch 6, join with sl st in the fist chain to form a ring.
Rnd 1: Ch 3,(counts as first dc), 2 dc in ring, (ch 3, 3 dc in ring) 5 times, ch 3, sl st in top of beginning ch 3 at start of round.
Rnd 2: st st in each of the next 2 dc, sl st in ch 3 sp, ch 3 (counts as first dc) (dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in same ch 3 sp *ch 2, skip next 3 dc, (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in next ch 3 sp**, repeat between * and ** 4 more times, then ch 2, skip next 3 dc, sl st in beginning ch 3 of round. Fasten off. Weave in ends.

Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124545
August 8th, 2005 at 03:40 AM
August 8th, 2005 at 03:40 AM
Joined: Aug 2004
Washington, the state that is....
Triss Offline
Member
Triss  Offline
Member

Joined: Aug 2004
Washington, the state that is....
I once did a 6 sided afghan for my grandmother. Thanks for the reminder, I think my new baby blanket is going to be a 6 sided one. I was planning on starting it today.


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
We are all under the same stars... therefore we are never far apart.
Re: Crochet 101 #124546
August 8th, 2005 at 11:07 PM
August 8th, 2005 at 11:07 PM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Hi everyone ~ wavey

This post is about "Storing Your Hooks".

Hooks are sold either individually or in small sets. The individual hook packaging is just a flat piece of cardboard with a hard plastic cover glued onto it.

The hooks sold in sets have an upgraded package that has small grooves for the hooks to rest within. These are rather tight-fitting and many people find it difficult to get the hooks in and out of them.

There are limitless other options for handy hook storage, and storing the hooks IS important. It can be terribly frustrating to KNOW you have an H hook someplace, can't find it, need to do a project, go get another H hook THEN find your original one! So what do ya do with two H's when you know you were hoping to buy a J later?

Not to mention the importance of preventing your hooks from getting scratched, bent, or otherwise misused and injured.

For those of you who also sew a little, and even for those of you who do not, an easy hook storage system is a roll-up pocket sleeve.

If you are not much of a seamstress, don't worry, this is truly easy to do.

All you need are two pieces of a medium weight fabric the same size. Make 2 rectangles slightly taller than the length of the hooks.

The idea is to put the fabric together in such a way as to make slim pockets to slide the hooks into, by running a line of stitches vertically between where each hook would go. Be sure to leave enough space between the lines of stitching so that the pocket can "bulge" once the hook is inserted. You don't want to make the pockets too narrow and thus too tight for the hooks.

Then you can add ribbon strands at both short ends so that when you add the hooks and roll it up, you can tie it closed. That keeps the hooks safe from getting lost or scratched and it still is a small enough package to either carry with you or store handily at home.

Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124547
August 9th, 2005 at 12:28 AM
August 9th, 2005 at 12:28 AM
Joined: May 2005
z6 S. Illinois
MaryReboakly Offline
Member
MaryReboakly  Offline
Member

Joined: May 2005
z6 S. Illinois
Crochet abbreviations

Once you know the stitches, you can read patterns easily by remembering a few basic shorthand abbreviations for stitches. There are so many free patterns and stuff online now. Here's a basic rundown of some abbreviations:

ch - chain
sc - single crochet
dc - double crochet
tr - trebble (triple) crochet
dtr - double trebble crochet
slst - slip stitch
yo - yarn over
fo - fasten off
rnd - round (when you're doing something in circle)
rep - repeat

Here's an example of a bookmark pattern:
R1: Ch 8, sc in 2nd ch from hook and in each rem ch. Ch 1, turn. (7 sc)
R2: Sc in same st as beg ch-1. Sc in each remaining st. Ch 1, turn.
Rows 3-36: Repeat Row 2.
Fasten Off & Weave in Ends.

'Translated', it would read:
Row 1: chain 8, single crochet in 2nd chain from hook and in each remaining chain. Chain 1, turn.
Row 2: Single crochet in same stitch as beginning chain 1. Single crochet in each remaining stitch. Chain 1, turn.
Row 3:Repeat Row 2. Fasten Off & Weave in Ends.

You may see now, even with this simple pattern, that shorthand makes pattern reading, writing, and following much less clumsy!


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Re: Crochet 101 #124548
August 9th, 2005 at 06:52 AM
August 9th, 2005 at 06:52 AM
Joined: Mar 2003
California
catlover Offline
The Cheetah!
catlover  Offline
The Cheetah!

Joined: Mar 2003
California
kit


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Re: Crochet 101 #124549
August 10th, 2005 at 01:32 AM
August 10th, 2005 at 01:32 AM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
An historical note for those of you with an interest in history...

Before pattern instructions were modernized and put into the format we see most commonly today, crocheters of the past referenced their stitches differently than we do.

They referred to the stitch we call the "slip stitch" as a "Single Crochet". What we call a single, they called a double, and so on!

I tell you, reading some antique patterns can be very misleading if you are not aware of this quirk!

Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124550
August 10th, 2005 at 01:56 AM
August 10th, 2005 at 01:56 AM
A
Anonymous
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered
A


Thank you for taking time to type out all this valuable information for those of us who are crochet-illiterate, Merme and Mary! kissies

Can you suggest where we can find explanations on how to execute the different stitches?
"Slip-stitch, double-trebble, fasten-off", it is like learning a foreign language! :rolleyes: laugh

Re: Crochet 101 #124551
August 10th, 2005 at 03:33 AM
August 10th, 2005 at 03:33 AM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Cricket, in answer to your question....

THE BASIC FIVE STITCHES

A "slip stitch" is

Insert hook through loop, y/o, pull yarn through. This allows you to move across the stitches below without adding height. A slip stitch can also be used to join rounds together without adding additional stitches.

A "single crochet" is

Insert hook through loop, y/o, pull through, y/o and pull through both loops on hook.


A "double crochet" is

y/o, insert hook through loop, y/o,pull through, y/o, pull through 2 loops on hook, y/o pull through last 2 loops on hook.


A "half double crochet" is

y/o, insert hook through loop, y/o, pull through, y/o, pull through all 3 loops on hook at one time.


A "triple crochet" is

y/o 2 times, insert hook in loop, y/o, pull through first 2 loops on hook, y/o, pull through next 2 loops on hook, y/o, pull through last 2 loops on hook.

You see? The name of the stitch refers to how many times you y/o and pull through sets of loops on the hook. You do it once for a single crochet, twice for a double, and three times for a triple.

The half double stitch means there are 3 loops on the hook as for a regular double, but you remove them all at once as for a single, so it is a "between" stitch. This is commonly used in a row that moves in height between a dc and and sc and you want it to look more like a slope than a step.


FASTEN OFF means, at the very end of your work where there is only one loop left on the hook, you y/o, pull through and cut the end. The yarn end attached to the skein or ball will be pulled out and the yarn end attached to your work will be left behind. You can pull the end in your work tightly so the last loop that was on your hook closes around it, making a knot.

For neatness and further security, you weave the loose end through the stitches. So you don't want to leave too long of a tail for weaving in most cases; an inch or so should do ya. If you do happen to have an extra long one, you can trim it after you weave it through a few times.

Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124552
August 10th, 2005 at 11:43 AM
August 10th, 2005 at 11:43 AM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
POSITIONING THE HANDS

Let's talk about the ways one can hold the hands for ease in crocheting.

The left hand holds the yarn or thread that leads to the skein or ball. It also controls the amount of "tension" - or- how "taut" the yarn is.

Tension is really important because it can completely alter a piece of work. Too tight, and the project will be much smaller than planned. Too loose, and it will be too big. Also, if you work with too much tension, you can make it difficult to pull the hook in and out easily.

An uneven amount of tension, going back and forth between loose and tight, will make a terribly irregular appearance of your work that won't please you any. It takes PRACTICE to learn proper tension and regularity of stitches, so don't despair.

I will add a word about "guage" later.

But for the left hand...

The yarn should come up between your thumb and pointer finger. It then goes over the back of the pointer and down between the pointer and middle finger. From there it passes across the palm loosely. Curl the pinky in just a bit to help hold it, but not too tightly. From under the pinky the yarn goes to the ball or skein.

Do not try to hold your stitches or your work with the thumb and pointer of the left hand. You need to be able to freely move your pointer up and down to control tension and keep the yarn moving well. Whatever you need to hold, hold it between the thumb and the middle finger, keeping the pointer up.

The right hand:

Here you have two options.

There is a very stylized, formal way of holding the hook for one option. This is the traditional way most people are taught.

In this grasp, you hold your hand with the palm facing up, toward you. Place the hook in your fingers with the hook end to the left and the top of the shank to the right, grasping it with your thumb and midway up your pointer just above where the indentation is in the hook.

Curl your middle finger a bit so that the nearly the tip is against the hook. Extend your ring finger all the way so that the tip is also against the hook. The pinky is kept free.


This is a very attractive, sort of elegant, pose for the right hand that the majority of people use.

However, there are some of us who prefer (or by necessity, must) use an alternate grasp.

In this optional grasp, the hook is placed in the fist with the palm facing down, away from you. The thumb and forefinger are near the hook end of the hook with the thumb extended fully and the pointer bent down so the hook rests against the inside of the first joint above the knuckle. In this grasp, the hook is held fairly loosely by all the other fingers and is excellent for people with hand or wrist difficulties.

For myself, I can crochet so much FASTER with my hook held this way, inelegant though it may be! And, with the thumb so near the hook end of the hook, I can use my thumb as needed to help control the loops on the hook.

So try both ways and see which you like best. As awkward as it feel at first, soon it will all be quite comfortable and seemingly second nature.

Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124553
August 10th, 2005 at 03:53 PM
August 10th, 2005 at 03:53 PM
A
Anonymous
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered
A


Oh, my poor head! kissies kissies angell

Re: Crochet 101 #124554
August 10th, 2005 at 10:28 PM
August 10th, 2005 at 10:28 PM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Hi again everyone~

Let's talk a bit about something Cricket mentioned...picking first projects to try.

I recommend that your very first project should be something:

Small
Simple
Easy to complete
And in a color you can really enjoy working with for a while.

It can take time to develop the ability to create really EVEN work, with all the stitches of the same size, one neatly done row after another. This takes PRACTICE and no one does it instantly!

But with practice, you can get yourself going so well you too will be able to achieve marvelous work equal to anyone else's.

Lots of people try to begin with something like a blanket. And certainly, that is an option. But personally, I don't recommend beginning with something that large -- for several reasons.

A blanket requires a considerable amount of time, even for an experienced crocheter. Often they have unusual patterns that are rather handsome but need to be executed perfectly in order for the blanket to have a pleasing appearance when completed.

There is also the issue of the color chosen. When you are making something large like a blanket or complex, like a sweater, be SURE you absolutely adore the color(s) you've selected because you are going to be looking at it for a long time! I guarantee there are few things worse then getting halfway through a project and realizing you are sick of looking at the thing and shoving it into a closet until further notice!

So, start small.
Start simple.
Start easy.
And choose your color well!

There is nothing wrong whatsoever with selecting a simple scarf for your very first project. You could even make an entire wardrobe of scarves for yourself, each one introducing a new stitch pattern and color. Or you could make scarves for your entire family. If you can master a scarf, you can master just about anything else there is, so don't think a scarf is unworthy.

It's actually rather like the musician who devotes much time to playing scales. If she can beautifully execute a musical scale in any key, then there is no piece of music beyond her reach. You see?

Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124555
August 10th, 2005 at 11:05 PM
August 10th, 2005 at 11:05 PM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Hi ~ wavey

Now let's talk a bit about choosing yarns.

Many patterns will give you a specific name brand, type of yarn and even color specifications. Some won't. And others you may wish to change to suit yourself. So here are a few guidelines to keep in mind when making selections.

First, consider the WEIGHT of the yarn you are looking over. Be sure that it is suitable for the project you are buying it for. Not only does weight of the yarn have an impact on "guage" (which we'll discuss later) and thus on size, but it also has an effect on useability or durability.

So if your pattern suggests a Worsted weight, 4 ply yarn, avoid looking at Sport weights which will be much thinner, or any of the Chunky, Bulky yarns available, which will make your project much thicker and bigger.

And there are ample selections in the Worsted weight category, so just take your time.

Think: What am I using this yarn for? Something that will require reqular laundering? or something that may be cleaned once every five years? Something that will be rubbing against bare skin or sitting on a shelf as a decoration?

SO FEEL YOUR YARNS CAREFULLY when you are shopping for yarn to make something to wear!

Many of the acrylics are 1) inexpensive 2)easy to work with 3)trouble free for laundering 4)come in a wide choice of colors that don't fade.

BUT! acrylics can be scratchy, even as real wool can be. So if it is something that will probably be against your face, be sure your face can stand the texture before you buy the yarn and invest all your efforts into making it.

Also, there are literally hundreds of very beautiful and fascinating designer yarns on the market these days. I'm sure you've seen the "Fun Fur" and boa-type yarns everywhere. Walking down the designer yarn aisle you will also see yarns with metallic thread added or glittery stuff or even small reflective mirrors and charms.

Then there is the whole category of the ultra bulky yarns that can be whipped up into a handsome cap or scarf in no time at all, hardly.

And certainly, all these choices are fun to try -- once you get a bit of experience behind you.

These yarns typically take a bit of effort in managing them while the work progresses. They can tangle easily. And, because they are made with so many loose fibers attached, it is easy to snag the hook where you don't mean to or have a problem passing the hook in and out.

With the bulky yarns you really must use hooks in the larger sizes...Size K on up, as they are the only ones big enough to catch the entire strand for the pull through part of the stitch.

So if you do choose to buy a bulky yarn to make an incredibly warm scarf for your first project, be sure to also purchase the correct size hook that will be listed on the yarn label if you don't already have it at home.

Also, be aware that although most yarns pull out easily if you've made a mistake and want to rework a particular row (or 2 or 10...), these designer yarns and bulky yarns DO NOT pull out easily! All those loose fibers tend to knot up while you are pulling your work out.

You can end up needing to carefully use scissors to get it out and thus waste yarn and maybe not have enough to complete the project... I'm telling ya that it can be annoying to have to buy another entire skein of an expensive yarn to complete just two rows to finish a project because you had to waste some of the original skein! Truly, that's a situation much to be avoided!

Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124556
August 10th, 2005 at 11:10 PM
August 10th, 2005 at 11:10 PM
Joined: Aug 2004
Washington, the state that is....
Triss Offline
Member
Triss  Offline
Member

Joined: Aug 2004
Washington, the state that is....
Since you mentioned it, how easy are the bulky adn fuzzy yarns to work with. Id really like to make Lys a scarf with one of those types of yarn but am really nervouse about trying it since I havent gone there yet.


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
We are all under the same stars... therefore we are never far apart.
Re: Crochet 101 #124557
August 10th, 2005 at 11:33 PM
August 10th, 2005 at 11:33 PM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
A FEW INTERESTING PATTERN STITCHES TO TRY

A brief word about directions for pattern stitches.

Most specific stitch instructions will include a reference to the number of chains you will need along your base row to execute the pattern.

For instance, the POPCORN stitch. If you want to do a practice swatch of it, so that you can repeat the stitch several times in the rows to get an understanding of how it will appear over a larger area, how do you know how MANY chains to do in order to make your foundation row so that you have enough for each repeat or so that you don't have extra chains hanging off the end? The instructions should tell you the answer to that question.

Instructions for the POPCORN stitch say "mulitiple of 4 + 2 chs". So what does that mean?

It means if you want to repeat the stitch 5 times in your swatch, you would begin with Chain 20 and then add the 2 additional chains. You would NOT multiply the 6 chains mentioned in the instructions, just the 4.

Ok, so here are the instructions for the POPCORN stitch:

MULTIPLE of 4 + 2 chains.
Row 1: Sc in second ch from hook and in each ch across. TO WORK POPCORN, 4 sc in sc or sp indicated, drop loop from hook, insert hook in first sc of 4 sc group, hook dropped loop and draw through.
Row 2: (right side): Ch 1, turn; sc in first sc *ch 1, skip next sc, work Popcorn in next sc, ch 1, skip next sc, sc in next sc; repeat from * across.
Row 3: Ch 1, turn, sc in first sc and in next ch-1 sp, (ch 1, sc in next ch-1 sp) across to last sc, sc in last sc.
Row 4: Ch 1, turn; sc in first sc, ch 1, sc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1, * work POPCORN in next ch-1 sp, ch 1, sc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1; repeat from * across to last 2 sc, skip next sc, sc in last sc.
Row 5: Ch 1, turn; sc in first sc and in next ch-1 sp (ch1, sc in next ch-1 sp) across to last sc, sc in last sc.
Row 6: Ch 1, turn; sc in first sc, ch 1, work POPCORN in next ch-1 s, ch 1 * sc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1, work POPCORN in next ch-1 sp, ch 1; repeat from * across to last 2 sc, skip next sc, sc in last sc.
Repeat Rows 3 to 6 for pattern.


SNAPDRAGON STITCH

Multiple of 8 + 5 chs.
Row 1: (right side): DC in fifth ch from hook, *skip next 3 chns, 5 dc in next ch, skip next 3 chs, (dc, ch 1, dc)in next ch; repeat from * across.
Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as first dc), turn; 2 dc in next ch-1 sp, skip next 3 dc, (dc, ch 1, dc) in next dc, * 5 dc in next ch-1 sp, skip next 3 dc, (dc, ch 1, dc) in next dc; repeat from * across to last sp, 3 dc in last sp.
Row 3: Ch 4, turn; dc in first dc, * 5 dc in next ch-1 sp, skip next 3 dc, (dc, ch 1, dc) in next dc; repeat from * across.
Repeat Rows 2 and 3 for pattern.


seed STITCH

Multiple of 2 chs
Row 1: (right side): Sc in second ch from hook, (ch 1, skip nest ch, sc in next ch) across.
Row 2: Ch 1, turn; sc in first sc and in next ch-1 sp, (ch 1, sc in next ch-1 sp) across to last sc, sc in last sc.
Row 3: Ch 1, turn; sc in first sc, ch 1, (sc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1) across to last 2 sc, skip next sc, sc in last sc.
Repeat Rows 2 and 3 for pattern.


Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124558
August 11th, 2005 at 12:59 AM
August 11th, 2005 at 12:59 AM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
THE MOST FAMOUS (and WARM!) HOODED SCARF!

One recommended yarn is:

Red Heart "Light & Lofty", which is 100% acrylic and is sold in 6 oz skeins. You will need 15 oz for this scarf (adult size).

Hook: US Size N-15 [10mm]
or use any hook to obtain gauge of
8 sts = 4", 5 rows + 4"


Chain 24, Row 1: Skip first 5 ch, (2 dc in next ch, skip next ch) 9 times, one dc in last ch; turn.
Row 2: Ch 3, skip first dc, (2 dc in sp between NEXT 2 dc) 9 times, dc in top of turning ch, turn.
Rep Row 2 for pat until 72" from beg. Fasten off.

Fold scarf in half. Beginning at the fold, sew a 10" seam (with yarn and tapestry needle) to form hood. Weave in ends.


This scarf can also be made a wider width by adding more chains in the beginning. In a wider width, the scarf hood part can be folded back on itself as a double layer for extra warmth on windy/really cold days, plus it forms a nice shawl when dropped to the back.

Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124559
August 11th, 2005 at 01:16 AM
August 11th, 2005 at 01:16 AM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Hi everyone ~ wavey

FINALLY, a word about gauge!

Ok, most patterns will give you a blurb about "gauge". It will say that so many stitches should equal this many inches; and these many rows should grow this tall. OK?

Sounds easy enough, right? If 8 stitches are to equal 4" for instance, and 5 rows are to equal 4" with a certain type yarn and hook size, then why might YOUR 8 stitches only equal 3 inches and YOUR 5 rows only 3"? Or even YOUR 8 stitches and 5 rows make a square that turns out 6" x 6"?

It's all a matter of gauge PLUS your personal tension style of crocheting.

Everyone crochets with a different amount of "tension" in their work. It's not something that someone can say "crochet to this degree of tautness exactly!" and measure it scientifically. Some people work more loosely or tightly than others.

So...when a pattern gives a "gauge", take a few moments and make the swatch with the proper yarn and hook size suggested. Then measure it to see how YOUR tension compares to the recommended finished size given.

If the swatch is SUPPOSED to be 4" x 4" and yours is only 3" x 3"...you need to either a) loosen up your stitches a bit OR b) use a larger hook.

Conversely, if your swatch turns out to be 6" x 6" instead of the recommended 4" x 4", then you should a) tighten up your stitches OR b) use a smaller hook.

BECAUSE the pattern is written in such a way as to help you achieve the finished project to the correct size!

If you are making a child's medium sweater, you really don't want it ending up fitting an adult medium. Or a tiny dress meant to cover a toilet paper roll becoming large enough to be worn by your youngest child. Don't laugh laugh things like that happen all the time.

So, be patient enough to make your gauge swatch BEFORE you begin the project. If it isn't the suggested size, make adjustments as needed. Then, if you haven't cut the yarn, just pull the swatch apart and begin your project.

Also, be SURE you are using the correct (specified) yarn and hook size recommended for the gauge, as you may have accidently picked up the wrong hook or were tempted in the store to buy a substitue yarn.

Although many patterns can be used with other yarn options, you have to consider how the yarn exchange will effect the total project. So... gauge is something important to know about!

Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124560
August 11th, 2005 at 02:56 AM
August 11th, 2005 at 02:56 AM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
ON THE IMPORTANCE OF COUNTING YOUR STITCHES AND ROWS

It is a marvelous idea to get in the habit immediately, with your very first project, of counting your stitches for each row.

I know, I know, it can be a daunting prospect as you work your way across 189 stitches for a blanket, to count each and every one of them.

But really, unless you are working in a particular pattern that gives you a clear indication you've ended the row correctly, there is really no other way of telling if you have perhaps added a few more stitches -- or lost a few -- as you worked the row.

So what's the big deal, you may well ask?

Well, losing or gaining stitches in places where they are NOT supposed to be lost or gained, will skew your work! Instead of nice, straight edges on your blankets or garment pieces that you will actually be able to align and sew together, you will have crookedness. And you will have odd little unintentional textures across the face of your item.

The edges of anything you crochet should look like this;

l___l
l___l
l___l

and not like

l____l
l______l
l_____l
l____l

you see?

And the best way to gaurantee that you will NOT have to tear out rows that have grown to an unlikely length is by counting! After all, much work went into those rows in the first place, so you really don't want to rip them out and do them all over!

However, if you are doing a pattern such as a Ripple Stitch afghan or blanket, and you know you have 11 chevrons across the row and by glancing at your work you see you have 11, then you are golden and don't have to count each stitch. Plus the peaks and valleys of the row would also be an indicator that you are not adding or subtracting anything willy-nilly.

By the way, adding or subtracting, gaining or losing stitches ON PURPOSE is called "INCREASING and DECREASING".

So count whenever you need to...which is quite often, more than likely. It will spare you much grief, I promise you that!


Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124561
August 11th, 2005 at 03:07 AM
August 11th, 2005 at 03:07 AM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
MORE ABOUT YARN WEIGHT:

Yarn weight (meaning it's type or size) is divided into six basic categories...


1) FINGERING yarn. These are fine weight yarns most often used for socks and baby clothes or items of some delicacy.

2) SPORT yarn. These are a bit heavier than Fingering yarns but are still light enough for light-weight sweaters, baby clothes, afghans, etc.

3) DOUBLE-KNIT yarn. This can be a good choice for sweaters and afghans that you don't want to be too bulky or heavy.

4) WORSTED yarn. Perhaps the most versatile of all the yarns. Sweaters, vests, hats, afghans, mittens, toys...you name it, you can probably make it out of worsted.

5) HEAVY WORSTED yarn. Ideal for sweaters and afghans or other items you would like to be extra heavy.

6) BULKY yarn. These can be worked into fun hats and mittens, heavy sweaters, scarves, jackets and even coats. Also some toy patterns would work well in the bulky category.

Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124562
August 11th, 2005 at 03:23 AM
August 11th, 2005 at 03:23 AM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
A WAY TO MAKE FRINGE

If your pattern doesn't specify directions for finge making, or if you would like to add it to something you've made or own already, here is one good way to do it.

Cut a piece of fairly stiff cardboard 3 inches wide and half as tall as you'd like your strands to be, remembering that some of the length will be lost in the attachment.

So if you want 6" long fringe, I would suggest thinking of perhaps 3.5" to 4" for the height of the cardboard.

Once your cardboard is cut, simply wrap your yarn from top to bottom, a bit loosely, but evenly. Try not to overlap the wraps.

When you get to the end, cut the yarn even at the bottom edge. Then, carefully cut all the way across the bottom end so that you finish with individual long strands of the desired doubled length.

Gather them up neatly together and fold them in half.

TO ATTACH FRINGE:

With WRONG side of item facing you, insert a hook down into the stitch or space you'd like your fringe to be. Holding on to the bundle of folded strands with your left hand, use the hook to grab the folded strands at the fold itself and pull them through forming a loop made of multiple strands.

Once you have the folded segment pulled through, withdraw your hook and pull the cut ends of the strands through the folded end. Some people use a hook for this step, others prefer their fingers. Just make sure you pull all the loose ends completely through.

When all the loose ends are through, grasp them together and pull up tightly so that the loop gets smaller and locks them into place.

If the cut ends have an uneven appearance, you can lay the work on a table and trim them carefully.

Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124563
August 11th, 2005 at 09:38 AM
August 11th, 2005 at 09:38 AM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
PRACTICE LESSON ONE -- FOR THE BEGINNER BEGINNER!

Oh, I'm so sorry and I apologize to all you brand new beginners. I sent this in a PM to someone and later thought I had posted it! So I will re-write it tonight so you ALL can have the first lesson.

The very FIRST thing you need to learn how to do is to "CHAIN".

The chain becomes the first edge of any flat piece you will ever crochet or the innermost part of any circle, so it's importance is paramount.

I would suggest you get yourself a ball or part of a ball of inexpensive yarn in a color you don't object to seeing. A worsted weight is probably the easiest. Get either a G or an H hook.

Ok, so to begin at the very beginning, you first must make a loop.

Take the cut end of the yarn, giving yourself oh about 3 to 4 inches, and simply cross it over to make a loop that isn't knotted, like an X whose top is closed.

Now, bring the cut end that is hanging down alongside of the connected end, and bring it up UNDER the loop you have made, so it bisects the loop.

Next, using your hook, pass it OVER the right hand side of the loop, UNDER the bisecting yarn, and back up OVER the left hand side of the loop.

The bisecting yarn will now be on top of your hook. Carefully grasping the tail of the cut end with you left hand, pull up on the hook with your right hand. The loop that was bisected will tighten around the base of the loop on your hook, making it secure.

Don't worry about how much of a tail the cut end has got as long as there is at least an inch or so dangling.

NOW YOU ARE READY TO ACTUALLY START TO CROCHET!

Following the instructions on how to wrap the yarn in your left hand, grasp the base of the knot you made with the dangling yarn under it (remembering to hold it with your thumb and middle finger).

Yarn over (y/o), and pull the yarn through the loop on your hook. CHAIN 1 complete!

If you can't get the hook to come out of the loop that is on it, you are holding the knot too tightly, so loosen it up a bit and try again.

Remember, all you are doing is y/o and pull through, y/o and pull through.

As you work you will begin to notice something. There will seem to be a difference in the size of your chains. Some will be smaller than others, some will look silly they are so loose.

That is because you are learning how to control the tension while learning how to move the hook at the same time.

Just keep going without fretting. Soon, oh after about 19,000 chains or so -- just kidding! -- you will feel more comfortable with the position of the hands, the yarn itself, as well as maneuvering the hook.

You will pick up speed and will notice a certain rhythm to your work. Your chains will become more uniform.

If it looks like too much of a mess in the beginning, do not hesitate to rip it all out and begin again. And again. And again if necessary. Just keep chaining. It is really THAT important!

By the way, I use the basic chain for any number of non-crocheted projects too. It makes for a very sturdy holding loop for anything fairly heavy.

I just chain to twice the length of the holding loop I want, finish off, and cut the yarn. With both ends secure, I simply fold the chain in half, and slide the folded end through whatever I want to hold up. Then, I just insert the two secured ends through the folded loop and pull until the loop tightens around them. And there I go, all set to hang whatever it was I wanted to hang.

This is ideal for hanging things outside by the way, as the chained yarn is very durable.

I have also made miles of chain in holiday colors to use as decorations. One year when Maxi was quite young, I made a chain using crochet thread instead of cotton, and I crocheted colorful Fruit Loops cereal right into the chain. It made a happy garland in our living room for the kid!

Also, you can chain using the cut legs of panty hose and a large hook. Once you have a long enough chain, you can make it into a rug for in front of a sink. Just lay one end of the chain on a table and begin to wrap the rest of the chain around and around, securing it together with simple whip stitches in plain, sturdy thread. Round or oval, depending on what you want. When it is big enough to suit you, stop.

The applications are nearly limitless PLUS as I said before, everything else you crochet will begin with a chain, so practice it!

And if you put it in and take it out so much the yarn gets fuzzy and frayed, just cut off the damaged part and begin again with fresh stuff.

You can do it, I know.

Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Re: Crochet 101 #124564
August 11th, 2005 at 10:09 PM
August 11th, 2005 at 10:09 PM
Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
Merme Offline OP
Member
Merme  Offline OP
Member

Joined: Oct 2004
Maine
HOW TO MAKE HANGING TOWELS

Materials:

18 x 28 Kitchen towel, which will make 2 hanging towels.

5/8" Buttons - 2

Sewing needle and thread

A sewing machine is handy but not necessary!

Worsted weight yarn in color to complement towel design, about 1.5 oz.

Size G/4.00mm Hook


PREPARE THE TOWEL

Fold towel in half so that short ends match and cut carefully along the fold.

If you have a sewing machine, simply zig zag along the cut edge, the turn under and hem.

If you don't have a sewing machine, you'll need to hem this edge by hand because remember towel fabric will fray!

You could overcast the raw edge then fold under twice, keeping the hem shallow.

Or you could apply some seam tape and also fold under.

CROCHET INSTRUCTIONS:

Row 1: With RIGHT side facing and working just below hem along top of towel, join* yarn with sc in top right corner. Now work 64 sc spaced evenly across top of towel. The row finishes with a total of 65 sc.

Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as first dc now and in each row later) turn; dc in next sc and in each sc across.

Row 3: Ch 3, turn; (skip next dc, dc in next dc) across. The row finishes with a total of 33 dc.

Row 4: Ch 3, turn; dc in next dc and in each dc across.

Rows 5 and 6: Repeat Rows 3 and 4. The 6th Row finishes with a total of 17 dc.

Rows 7 and 8: Ch 3, turn; (skip next dc, dc in next dc) across. The 8th Row finishes with a total of 5 dc.

Rows 9 through 17: Ch 3, turn; dc in next dc and in each dc across.

Row 18 BUTTONHOLE ROW: Ch 3, turn; dc in next dc, ch 1, skip next dc, dc in last 2 dc. The row finishes with a total of 4 dc and 1 ch.

Row 19: Ch 3, turn; dc in next dc and in each st across; finish off. The row finishes with a total of 5 dc.

SEW button to RIGHT side of hanger at Row 6.


*how to JOIN with sc: Begin with slip knot on hook. Inset hook in place indicated, Y/O and pull up a loop, Y/O and draw through both loops on hook.

Merme


[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]


"In the midst of winter, I learned there lives in me an invincible summer" Camus (maybe a paraphrase)
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3

Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.0
(Release build 20190122)
PHP: 7.2.24 Page Time: 0.038s Queries: 14 (0.015s) Memory: 0.9211 MB (Peak: 1.3343 MB) Data Comp: Zlib Server Time: 2019-12-11 13:49:10 UTC