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#115464 June 6th, 2005 at 03:18 PM
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I noticed this morning that many of my new water hyacinths (have only had them 1 week) are turning red at the base of the round parts. Is this normal? What causes this?


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#115465 June 8th, 2005 at 03:16 PM
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I don't know...but I'm glad you posted that picture!
I want some of those!
Gonna have to send Rachel out to look for some today.

Cindy

#115466 June 9th, 2005 at 02:43 AM
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Mine have done the same thing as yours. So I would guess it is normal. Duh smile

#115467 June 9th, 2005 at 03:00 AM
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Cindy, Hope you are feeling better. thumbup BTW Did you ever get any plants for your pond?

Donna flw

#115468 June 9th, 2005 at 03:37 AM
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Nope.
The algae is killing me.
I go out there a hundred times everyday and move a big umbrella around to give my fishies some shade. They have nothing to hide in, and the pond has no plants.

I'm pond ignorant.

Cindy

#115469 June 9th, 2005 at 12:45 PM
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Water hyacinth is one of the biggest aquatic weeds in eastern australia. Aint it weird how something can have a problems growing in one part of the world and just become the most aggressive SOB somewhere else.
==================================================I go out there a hundred times everyday and move a big umbrella around to give my fishies some shade.
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Hey Cindy. Just get a rock or a bale of hay or anything and sit it on the pond edge overhanging the water. On the western side preferably to block hot afternoon sun. Even a dead branch with the leaves on each few days is better than moving the umbrella around. Or string a piece of shadecloth over the whole pond....

#115470 June 11th, 2005 at 04:20 PM
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If the algae is a problem, adding plants can usually balance that back out. Especially floaters. They not only provide shade to the water, which reduces the sunlight the algae can use, they compete for nutrients with the algae. Look for fast growers like parrots feather, the hyacinths and there is another one called shoehorn or something close to that.

#115471 June 17th, 2005 at 09:23 AM
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cindy, try some lily pads and other plants that float....it will help to control the algea and will be nice for your fish. Also, maybe some snails or "bottom feeder" fish. Of course, they leave waste also, so they might not help much.

#115472 July 13th, 2005 at 10:47 AM
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Check to see if water hyacinth is illegal in your state. It is in several,as is water lettuce. Duckweed is a cheap, fast cover for fish. Here's what I did for shade from weeks of 100+ weather: I made a tent from PVC, shade cloth, and electrical quick ties. You'll need 2-4 T-connectors at the corners for legs and a cross piece. If you get the bendy PVC, you can attach it at the front and bend it over into the ground. Spread the shade cloth and secure with the quick ties. It's very cheap and has saved my plants/fish. Just push the PVC legs into the ground.


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