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#95794 Jul 23rd, 2007 at 11:29 AM
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My tomato plants have already produced a ton and now have stopped. They are growing and growing and taking over the garden! They are so big that they've weighted down the cages that USED to support them and are now an ugly mess laying on the ground. I know that when they were seedlings and I was transplanting them, the advice was to plant them up to the first set of leaves because the stem was capable of making roots. So my question is this...
If I pull up my mater plants and clip off one of the healthy "branches" can I plant that in the ground and it will root? I am hoping to clean things up in the garden and hopefully get another crop of maters (THIS time securing the growing plants much better!)

Thanks,
JoAnn

BTW, if it makes any difference, I'm in S.Texas and the variety of tomatoes are Roma, Beefsteak and Better Boy.

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JoAnn I will go get a pic of what I am doing to root them. I learned this from another great site and have already rooted two of the suckers and plan on doing 2 at a time. My original 2 brandywine tomatoe plants got a beating from a few hail storms and they don't look nice, but are still flowering just the same. But I have decided not to keep them tall an have started to root them while still on the plant.


Nuria
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I hope this helps.
I cut the yogurt container in half and made a hole at the bottom thru which to put the stem of the sucker. Then duct taped it and have string which is holding the container up. ( could've drilled 2 holes at the top and put the string thru there and held it against a bamboo stick, but it was just an experimental one so i didn't go all out). One week later it was rooted and I transplanted it into another pot. (You can also use a clear container which might be easier to tell once it's rooted.)
[Linked Image]


Nuria
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That is GENIUS!!! I'm going to give it a try!
Thank you sooooo much!

JoAnn


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