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#66563 Jun 14th, 2007 at 08:30 PM
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My mom bought me a potted mum way early this spring, well now that its dead(or so I thought)I had already cut the top off last month or so and was kinda cleaning up old pots and ran across this one and dumped it out to find that it had a huge ball of bulbs attached to it. What do i do with it now? Can someone please give me some advice, it was a lovely plant and if I can transplant the bulbs and will I have more or is the damage done?

Dragonsgold #66575 Jun 14th, 2007 at 09:42 PM
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Sorry, I don't know much about mums.. at least not in the state that yours are in.. lol But I would think you would be ok.. Someone will come along and know for sure.. Good luck hon!!!

Dragonsgold #66581 Jun 14th, 2007 at 11:57 PM
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I too am slightly flummoxed. A picture might have been helpful. But if you really do mean chrysanthemums, these dont have bulbs as such - they are mostly herbaceous perennials and have clumps of roots, with rhizomes/stolons if they're hardy. If they are hardy (rather than florist) you would have seen a rosette of leaves on the crown after the'd stopped blooming and could have tried naturalising them in your garden. But chopping the top off wouldnt have helped their chances.
If they are some sort of spring flowering potted bulbs, I think the usual thing to do is place them in a dark, cool (but above freezing), dry and well ventilated place until autumn. Dont seal them in a box. But if you dont have a convenient storing space inside you might find it better to plant them directly outdoors now and then treat as with any other spring flowering garden bulb. They might flower again.

starfish #67284 Jun 15th, 2007 at 02:26 PM
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Nevermind they were easterlilly's

Dragonsgold #67802 Jun 16th, 2007 at 01:48 PM
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Well, you can still plant these out in your garden and they should flower next year. Plant about six inches deep, in well drained soil (which is key) in sunny location. Mulch in winter to protect from frost.
Good luck!

starfish #68633 Jun 17th, 2007 at 10:11 PM
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Is MT an abbreviation for Montana? If so, I'd be surprised if they were hardy for you.



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PartyGirl #68904 Jun 18th, 2007 at 07:49 AM
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I think they are good to zone 6.I grew some in Indpls in ground and they returned & it surprised me too.But I used mulch pine bark 9 inches deep.If you want to grow some in your garden try looking at catlogs and find some crossed with orientals.Those are hardy to zone 3-4.I know Wayside carries but sure others do as well.


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