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#52501 May 27th, 2007 at 02:42 PM
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DaisyM Offline OP
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Hi, I wasn't quite sure where to post this question? My son is getting rid of his perrenials under the front window, so I decided I will save some. Can they be dug out and still grow normally throughout the summer...

I clematis
1 spirillia
1 global grass
Ferns
lily of the valley

Can these be moved?
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[*]Can I move them now?
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[*]null

DaisyM #52522 May 27th, 2007 at 03:27 PM
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Yes to clematis, Ferns and lily of the Valley: Just keep them watered till they get established.

Clematis dislikes being moved so here is a suggestion: Choose 4 strong stems. Cut these back to the lowest 5 or 6 leaves per stem. Remove all the rest of the growth. Using a spade go out from the root system and sink the spade straight down. Do this all the way around the clematis. What you are trying to do is dig the plant out without disturbing its roots. Re plant the rootball so it sets 2" below the soil line. Mulch and keep watered during the season. Don't feed. It may pout this year but will come back next year.

Ferns: Don't hold the plant by the fronds when digging out or transplanting. These may also pout and drop the fronds but keep watered and they will do fine. These do need shade.

lily of the Valley: This is a very invasive plant. If you move it keep it well away from other plants or beds. Put it in a bed and not only will it take over and choke everything out, you will be digging it out forever.

Am not familiar with the other two plants you named.


herbalyn #52527 May 27th, 2007 at 04:04 PM
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Thanks for the advice, and yes the lily of the Valley has taken over the area, so maybe I will pass on it.

DaisyM #52618 May 27th, 2007 at 07:17 PM
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how long has the clematis been there? i moved one of mine last year (had been in that spot for 5 or 6 years) and the root ball was a good foot wide and about 9 inches deep.

make sure to start far out from the base of it and work your way in until you hit the root ball - then dig around the perimeter of it. that's what i did because i had no idea how big the ball would be and i knew they don't like the roots fiddled with. i also did the same going down - wanted to make sure i got most, if not all, of the bottoms of the roots.

i had the new spot prepared - had to increase the size a bit when i saw just how big the root ball was - so it wasn't out of the ground for too long (about 40 minutes tops). since you're probably going to be longer than that, i'd suggest wetting an old towel down (really soak it) and wrap the ball in it for transporting. also, have a basic hole at your place already dug - if you need to make it bigger it won't take that long.

i wouldn't worry about cutting it back - i didn't. it pouted a bit (they always go into shock when the roots are fiddled with) and then bounced back and even bloomed.

also, make sure to use root stimulant - mix it up (it's a liquid concentrate) and pour some in the hole, put the clematis in and back fill and then pour some more of the mix around the plant. water well to settle the soil. i'd also water every day - or at least every other - for a month.

edit:

yes, keep the clematis mulched all the time. i also put a large rock over the roots to help keep them cool (on the side that gets the most sun).

the spirea should be treated as the clematis - i moved one last year also. that was from the neighbors yard - i've no idea how long it had been there. THAT was a real bear to get out!! yes, it was a bit of an akward spot (the other bush had grown too large next to it so i could only work from two sides) but still! it took me over an hour to get that out. not a very deep root system - i guess it was just really old (probably 20-25 years) so what was there was VERY established.

haha, i also moved lily of the valley last year too...it was after they'd bloomed. they came up this year and bloomed nicely.

i DIDN'T get to the fern last year, so the info here will be helpful to me too.

can't help with the globe grass - i don't have any.

you're good for transplanting - this is the right time of year to move things.

edit 2: i forgot...the root stimulant can be used for all the plants. it really does wonders with helping the transplanted items get re-established!



Last edited by joclyn; May 27th, 2007 at 07:28 PM.

Zone 6b
Joclyn #52639 May 27th, 2007 at 09:01 PM
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I have no idea just how long these plants have been there, but after reading your post I see that I'm probably in for alot of work. The clematis is at the side of the house and not doing well, about 4 feet ( it never had any support frame) but who knows about the root. Maybe it's more root than plant. I'll deal with one plant at a time. Thank you for the advice.


DaisyM #52650 May 27th, 2007 at 09:28 PM
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if the clematis is in too sunny a spot, that may answer for why it's not doing well. some varieties need some bit of shade. they also need pruning - which can vary as to time of year with different varieties. do you know which one it is? if not, can you post a pic of it - preferably with the flower?

if you can get to 3 sides of the spirea, you should be done pretty quickly. i had the huge bush to deal with (it had completely overgrown the spirea) as well as the porch and the hydrangea - i was working with about 2 feet of space and could only get the shovel in on two sides (barely that, even). if you can, remove whatever is next to the spirea first, then take that out.

i prefer to move things like bushes and plants in the spring so that they have time, over the summer, to get those roots out and re-established before winter hits. bulbs can easily be done in the fall - they're basically dormant by then, so moving them then isn't so much an issue. you can move them in the spring tho, too. for the lily of the valley, they're probably done blooming - just leave the greens on (that feeds the bulb for next year) and pop them up (they're easy to move since they're a bulb) or you can wait until later in the season - your choice :wink:

moving anything that's been established for more than a couple of years is always a bit of work. the clematis are just extremely picky about their roots - that's why all the extra caution about moving it.


Zone 6b
Joclyn #52675 May 28th, 2007 at 03:18 AM
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Yup, I have to move clematis's as well. I have the shade one in the sun and the sun one in the shade lol . My stupid mistake.

Our winters are so cold here that my clematis usually starts straight from the ground again every spring. Only once did it start about 2 feet high on the old vines.


~~Tam~~Those who think country life is simple....have never lived on a farm.
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