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#372389 Jul 3rd, 2013 at 01:51 PM
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Devin Offline OP
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I recently purchased a new home and it has a beautiful ginkgo tree in the back yard. Before I mowed the lawn (which was in really bad shape), I noticed that the ginkgo had a ton of little seedlings.

Rather than killing them with the mower, I dug some up and put them in pots. My hope is to grow them into full trees.

Anyway, one of my seedlings looks a tad brown on the bottom. I'm new to growing a plant and I don't know if this is normal or stem rot.

The leaves are green and it looks healthy, but the stem has me worried. Please let me know if it is in trouble and, if so, is there any remedy.

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Welcome, Devin. I have no clue as to the browning on your tree. I would not worry about it too much if the tops are still doing well. I hope it recovers to become a beautiful tree for you.


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Originally Posted by Devin
I recently purchased a new home and it has a beautiful ginkgo tree in the back yard. Before I mowed the lawn (which was in really bad shape), I noticed that the ginkgo had a ton of little seedlings.

Rather than killing them with the mower, I dug some up and put them in pots. My hope is to grow them into full trees.

Anyway, one of my seedlings looks a tad brown on the bottom. I'm new to growing a plant and I don't know if this is normal or stem rot.

The leaves are green and it looks healthy, but the stem has me worried. Please let me know if it is in trouble and, if so, is there any remedy.


Devin I can't view your picture,, so sorry, we normally use a photobucket account ( image line once you load into photobucket) and copy and paste directly here into the post. The "enter an image" button doesn't always load for all of us, sorry to say.
Don't know why your stems are brown, are they soft?? If so could be root rot, if not, I wouldn't be concerned too much if you're still getting new leaves,, Good Luck thumbup


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Devin Offline OP
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Here is a photo bucket link. Hopefully this will be more helpful. Thanks for all your help.

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Thank you Devin, thumbup
I see the brown at the base, is it soft where it's brown at?? IF it is soft, then it very well may be root rot and nothing can be done sorry.
I also notice white and green under the brown so it doesn't Look like root rot. IF the stem feels firm I would take it out of the container, purchase a good rich compost and fill at least 1/4 of the container with compost the rest with a good sandy soil for trees.
Ginkgo kept in a container needs regular watering, especially when actively growing. Water your ginkgo tree when the soil feels dry down to your second knuckle on your index finger.
Ginkgo trees require well-draining soil to thrive. They grow in heavy clay, loam or light, sandy soil, but of all these soil types, sandy soil is best for the ginkgo tree.
When you dig a hole for your ginkgo tree, fill the bottom with a 2-inch layer of compost. Ginkgo does not need additional fertilizer to thrive.
They must receive full sun, they grow poorly in the shade.
Keep the soil moist during its first three to five years. The ginkgo tree is drought tolerant after that time.
Thanks for re posting the picture and keep us updated with the progress of your Ginkgo tree,


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Devin Offline OP
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Thanks for your feedback! The stem doesn't seem soft - quite rigid when I probe it with the end of a paperclip.

The plant seems to be doing well. It was wilted this weekend - mainly because my office was probably 150 degrees! However, a little cool air and shade and its back looking healthy. For now it looks good. Its even growing a new branch.

Anyway, I have it in a pot that contains potting soil on the bottom. Its one of the models with the opening at the bottom so I can add water to simulate ground water - or water from the top to simulate rain. Which would be better for the ginkgo?

The plant had quite a trip to get here - two car trips - very bumpy car trips. Maybe the brown is just an injured stem from swaying back and forth. At least that's what I hope.

Second question, when does a ginkgo (or a seedling in general) start to grow bark? Does it start at a specific location (top of tree for instance) or just it happen all at once?

Thanks again for your help! :)



Originally Posted by angelblossom
Thank you Devin, thumbup
I see the brown at the base, is it soft where it's brown at?? IF it is soft, then it very well may be root rot and nothing can be done sorry.
I also notice white and green under the brown so it doesn't Look like root rot. IF the stem feels firm I would take it out of the container, purchase a good rich compost and fill at least 1/4 of the container with compost the rest with a good sandy soil for trees.
Ginkgo kept in a container needs regular watering, especially when actively growing. Water your ginkgo tree when the soil feels dry down to your second knuckle on your index finger.
Ginkgo trees require well-draining soil to thrive. They grow in heavy clay, loam or light, sandy soil, but of all these soil types, sandy soil is best for the ginkgo tree.
When you dig a hole for your ginkgo tree, fill the bottom with a 2-inch layer of compost. Ginkgo does not need additional fertilizer to thrive.
They must receive full sun, they grow poorly in the shade.
Keep the soil moist during its first three to five years. The ginkgo tree is drought tolerant after that time.
Thanks for re posting the picture and keep us updated with the progress of your Ginkgo tree,

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It would have to mature, to start getting bark,, probably at least a year, I would just guess that why and I would water from the top thumbup


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