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#36980 May 3rd, 2007 at 09:47 AM
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I've been talking about this in CH and thought I'd give it it's own thread. I really wanted to put this in the Shade garden forum but I also wanted it in the frugal gardening forum. Here is the area for my new garden. It is probably around 15 (deep)x6 ft. This area gets no direct sunlight but recieves lots of bright sunlight reflected off the garage (on the right). The right is North, straight ahead is West and the left is south. The bricks are going to be removed.
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Here is the garden that is right in front of it.
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With all the suggestions so far, here is what we're thinking. Please feel free to share your opinions and suggestions. Put a trellis on the windows at the back, maybe put a shade tolerant clematis there? Maybe put a fountain on some nature towards the back, center. I'm thinking something more of a formal garden, with lots of free space. Also I'm considering seeing if I can get some chipped wood from local tree removal people to use as mulch. I'd like plants that can stand alone--like hostas but flowers would be great also. At the very front of this area, just after the end of the garage, we were thinking of putting in a little pond, sorta kidney shaped with a few fish. DH would like a few large stepping stones leading off into the back so we can get to the spicket if we need too without damaging anything. I thought the stepping stones might make it look a little more inviting and maybe look deeper.

Please give me suggestions/ideas/opinions. We haven't even started tearing out bricks yet, so I've got plenty of time! We'd prefer to keep this as inexpensive as possible but also looking great because we're going to sell the house in a few years. Plant suggestions are also welcome, not sure what I'm looking for...

Thanks, you guys have the neatest ideas!!
Sarah



Sarah - Zone 5b/6
LandOfOz #37015 May 3rd, 2007 at 11:57 AM
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1. Arbor - wood and stained (not painted) a light lavender/lilac. lilac blends well with green and doesn't become a focal point. Place arbor far enough from windows so air flow and maintenance isn't blocked. It should not be higher than the top of the windows. View from inside to decide placement. This will give the illusion of looking at your garden thru a door. Use two clematis to fit your color scheme. A fountain could be placed in the center of the arbor. Look for a thin arbor, nothing chunky. Check with your high school woodworking shop to see if they can custom make something for you.

2. Will the existing garden remain in place? If not make a curved path starting just off the cement apron where it looks like lillies are now. Use two gate posts on either side at the beginning of the path. Continue the path to just inside the arbor. Lay stepping stones down the middle of the path right to the end of the arbor and fill in with wood mulch. Lay bricks on their side buried three quaters deep along the edge of the path for a border. You want to just see the brick border not trip over it. Keep the path wide enough for kneeling and reaching into any area of the beds.

3. Water feature. Place on an angle starting at the corner of the garage and extending out toward the path. About where the soil patch is now at the corner of the garage.

4. Place some vertical feature just behind #3 at the beginning of the garage wall like a small shepards's hook. Use a hanging basket with the most colorful coleus you can find. There is a new trailing variety this year in burgandy and hot pink. Add a square colorful glazed pot in front of the garage. Something narrow at the bottom and flaring out at the top. If you have a Big Lots they have great pots. Fill with one annual plant that will grow tall and have dark green foliage and continuous blooms. Nothing trailing in this pot - it will detract from your water feature.

5. Remove the growth along the foundations and mulch heavily so you won't need to get in there to weed. Use a pulmonaria at each corner of the window wall. Use brick, standing on their side to make an angled border in front of each pulmonaria. If you choose hosta limit them to the back corners. Planted along the sides they will overwhelm and crowd the space.

6. For the rest of the foundation beds if you like burgundy plant material use that as accent touches to plant in the ground or in small pots along the walls. Burgundy is stunning played off white walls. Since the space is small and enclosed you don't want to overdo the color. Or, you could fill the foundation beds with two alternating colors of impatients.

7. In the space just beyond what looks like bedroom windows you need something to fill in and anchor that side. Plant a dwarf shrub below the last window, just out from that and on an angle toward the garage place a metal bench, with another dwarf shrub at the end of the bench. Or two dwarf shrubs planted along that wall to fill in space. Choose something short but bushy so you don't block light or air to the windows or have to prune. There is a new phlox cultivar that is a dark burgundy. It might lead you to a burgandy-peach-pink-green color scheme.

8. Lastly, if you can, paint the tall vent with white rustoleum.

Lucky you, what a great project and you have so many plant choices in color and shape to work with. Find one plant at the nursery you really like. Then choose colors that play off that plant. Avoid using anything white or any hardscape with straight lines or edges. Remember, above all else -before and after photos.

herbalyn #37279 May 3rd, 2007 at 08:47 PM
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first off, to conserve on funds, reuse the bricks! take them all out and the put in a pathway that's, say, 2 feet wide. or, you could make stepping stones with them. bunches of 6 or 8 set together in a pattern and repeated every couple of feet (whatever the span of stride is).

that pipe/vent thing...can it be replaced with something that is smaller and goes down instead of up? would be easy enough to plant something in front of it. if it can't changed, put some type of climbing thing in and train it over that.

a small pond would be lovely right in the spot where the hosta is. you can reuse them and the other things that are there back further. i'd also spread out the lily (is it?) so that it curves around the pond.

a simple trellis that goes from corner to corner and above the windows will frame out the windows nicely. you could do the same to the two windows in the left of the pic too - carry the theme through. and some type of low shrub or tall flowering plant under the windows. whatever you put on the trellis should compliment the shrub/plant and vice versa.

a small bench - one of those iron ones (painted white) in that airy victorian style would be nice placed out from the 3 windows - maybe even a small matching table too. you don't want it all the way in the back - don't want it right up on the pond tho either.

various plants and flowers at the base of the walls and you could put in some of the moss that handles foot traffic to cover the areas directly around the brick path/brick stepping stones.

oak leaf hydrangea, azalea, rhododendron, spirea, baby's breath, pieris, ferns, lamium, cranesbill geranium, hosta, sweet woodruff, lily of the valley, blue bells, forget-me-not, bleeding heart, honeysuckle, virgin's bower, some clematis, trumpet vine are some things to consider.


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Joclyn #37392 May 4th, 2007 at 05:06 AM
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I would probably go with a hidden garden type theme. With a hedgerow around the outside edge to hide it and then a tall thin fountain rather than a pond and use the bricks underneath and around the fountain to give it height. With a 24 inch gate with peekaboo cutout that would end up the same height as the hedgerow.

I would be looking for 3 hanging baskets for infront of the 3 windows and tall spiky plants for underneath the window so that from the window it would look like a jungle.

Along one wall I would try for some type of tree that you could prune into a two dimentional shape. I've always thought those looked great against a garden wall. I love the idea of the sweet woodruff as a ground cover. It smells so good. Ferns near the fountain would be lovely. The Japanese Painted Ferns would be colorful too.

And I would agree that vines between and around the two windows on the left side of the photo would be wonderful. And with the wall already there it is easy to do an eye screw and fish line trellis. That keeps the price of the trellis down to nearly nothing.

I would place the gate at the very front of the area so you look straight back through the entire area. From that angle it would look bigger as you approached the gate.

As previously mentioned I would probably add a bench or if their is sufficent room a small table and two chairs. Those are expensive items though so that has to be factored into it.

For plants lets see.

Bear's Breeches, Variegated and regular for in front of the window it reaches a height of 5 feet but dies back to the ground in winter.

Acer circinatum 'Pacific Fire' Maple, Vine this tree would work for the two dimentionally pruned tree I was talking about for the bare wall. And with the young branches being that strikeing red it will add even more interest with the bright green and pink leaves.

Boxwood is a great hedge and since it will be located where it will get the morning sun it should do well.

Arachniodes aristata var 'Variegata' East Indian Holly Fern is another fern that would be nice in the area around your fountain.

Arum italicum, Arum, If your zone will allow for this plant it could be intermingled with the bears breeches since it comes out of dormancy in the fall and grows all winter. And it has such a cool look.

Asplenium scolopendrium 'Laceratum Kaye' Kaye's Lacerated Harts Tongue Fern

Athyrium augustum forma rubellum 'Lady in Red'

Astilbe simplicifolia 'Hennie Graafland' Ostrich Plume this is just one of many Astibles that you could add to this garden area.

Pigsqueak is another flowering plant that will do well in your garden and add winter interest with it's bronze to dark purple foliage depending on type.

As you can see by my choices I like a four season garden that gives me lots of interesting things to look at all year long.













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tkhooper #37505 May 4th, 2007 at 07:47 AM
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The existing garden is going to be revamped so that it matches the new one going in. The existing garden also gets a few hours of sun in the early morning and mid-afternoon to evening.

The little window on the left is the kitchen window and the two larger ones are my living room. I constantly have these windows open, so I love the idea of looking out into a jungle. I also like the idea of using an arbor to make the nasty windows look like a somewhat hidden doorway.

Definitely will be painting the vent with heat-resistant rustoleum. What a good idea! It can't be altered for a few reasons, namely, DH doesn't want to do that. lol

Also, I think I will keep the colors all within a theme. I hang my hummer feeder over there, so red/burgundy would be great - to help attract more hummers/butterflies. Also keeping the colors similar will help the garden maintain a more formal feel.

I really love that astilbe hennie, Tammy. It is beautiful! I like the bears breeches, too, but I'm worried about how invasive they are.

Japanese Painted Ferns are my favorites and I will probably have to put a few in together. Also, I already have 2 hostas that will need to be incorporated in.

Thanks for the suggestions, ladies! I love reading them and imagining them. Keep the suggestions coming!

Thanks!


Sarah - Zone 5b/6
LandOfOz #37561 May 4th, 2007 at 09:25 AM
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For the invasiveness I would suggest a ground/root barrier or putting them in buried pots.


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tkhooper #37592 May 4th, 2007 at 10:40 AM
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Pink Clematis

OR

Burgundy Clematis?

I really like the pink and burgundy theme. Only problem I have with it, is that it was my mothers wedding colors. And if there is one thing I don't want to be reminded of, it's my mother. lol My favorite color is purple, but I think that it might not be liked by whomever moves in when we move (which is still a few years off)... That, and I can't think of a good complementary color for purple.


Sarah - Zone 5b/6
LandOfOz #37688 May 4th, 2007 at 01:08 PM
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for contrast it would be yellow. Or you could do the red hat society colors of red and purple. Or I like the deep purple hot pink and emerald green combination.


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tkhooper #37689 May 4th, 2007 at 01:09 PM
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with deep purple you could have persian shield. You might have to put it in a pot and move it indoors for most of the year but it's such a great color.


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tkhooper #37728 May 4th, 2007 at 02:49 PM
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to offset purple, use pink, yellow, orange or some light greens. regardless of what colors you choose, always throw in some white in a spot or two. you've already got that hosta...where ever you end up putting it, something else with white across from it will balance things out and add in a couple of bright spots.

purple/orange and purple/yellow are particularly nice.

the two-dimensional tree/bush thing is called espelliar (i probably spelled it wrong!). i was going to mention that, too. it's terrific for small areas like that. you still get your bush/tree for the interest that they provide...only it's compacted so i doesn't take up a ton of the precious room that's available.

i love persian shield!!!! that color scheme would be really nice too!! purples with silvers. very, very different!!! the persian shield isn't hardy where you are (you're about the same zone as me) so you'd need to keep it in pots and bring it inside in the winter.

japanese painted ferns are perfect for that area! and there are a couple different color varieties...you could do a couple of two of them - the purple one and i believe there's also a silverish or white one.

if you're going to do purples, i have coneflowers seeds i could send ya! and some purple bearded iris too.

oh, and hit some yard/garage sales...you might find the perfect little table/chairs set for a really good price!!


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tkhooper #37757 May 4th, 2007 at 04:36 PM
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Don't overlook a peach/apricot and burgundy combo. With a splash of lime green its a knockout combination. Burgundy clematis is a good choice played off the white of your home. In the shade of the yard it will be lost. Play dark colors against white and medium to light colors in shade (in your case just not white).

Visit a plant store and find a burgundy spike, pair it with lime green sweet potato vine and something peach or apricot, maybe impatients. Add dusty miller to the middle to tie everything together. Hold something white behind the group. Since you like purple/pink try that with lime green and dusty miller. Try different color combos until you find the one against white that makes you say bingo!. Next stop is the paint department to get swatches in those colors. Take them home to hold against your white siding in a.m. and p.m. light. If these are your colors find something in your house that shade, sit it in the garden space and spend a day looking at it. A main dark color needs lighter green or varigated plant foliage. A main lighter color will call for darker plant folaige. You'll get a feel for this method by the second combo you try.

Don't make color choices with future owners in mind. Get what you like, you have to live with it. The next owner is just as likely to rip everything out and put in a cooking deck or a dog run.

Choose plants with your limited space and shade in mind. Stick to airy, lacy, small tender perennials that die back rather than big, thick woody perennials who's roots would have no where to go but under the concrete apron and foundations. In an enclosed area like yours, air circulation and maintenance become important, don't set up housekeeping for powdery mildew or moss.

If using vines put them on something free standing and away from walls. Look for varieties that twine rather than attach with suckers. Vines will find their way into your walls, crawl and attic if they're tight against a wall.

Since cost and a future move are issues consider watching for plant exchanges. You learn what does well in your area, ask for advice. Make starts from one of your hostas and other plants you have and trade for plants on your "want' list. Invest in hardscape for your space that could move with you. You may find these two things pretty much fill your space. Join a garden club, members always have orphan plants free to a good home.




herbalyn #37854 May 4th, 2007 at 07:45 PM
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Originally Posted by herbalyn
The next owner is just as likely to rip everything out and put in a cooking deck or a dog run.


shock boohoo Don't tell me that!!

What is burgundy spike? Is it a plant 'cause I goggled it and didn't get anything. I think I saw a plant at walmart that I almost bought...corydina something like that. It was a deep burgundy about 2-3 ft tall, thick, spiney leaves. Is that it?


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LandOfOz #37890 May 4th, 2007 at 09:09 PM
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Burgundy spike was meant as a reference to any plant you find with that color and a upright spiky growth to use in a color grouping trial. I wasn't leaning toward any named variety. Cordyline would work for a trial. It's good for a container but needs sun and has to be wintered indoors. Enjoy your project.

The dog run pun isn't to far off from a neighbor down the streeet who ripped out a shrub walled cottage garden and cut down a tree, then replaced it with half of a full size basketball court.


herbalyn #38046 May 5th, 2007 at 04:53 AM
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I'm glad I never move locally. I'd die if I saw something like that.

But I have been told that landscape doesn't improve the FMV of a home although it does improve it's saleability.


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tkhooper #38931 May 7th, 2007 at 06:17 AM
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I know that it may not improve the actual value of the home, but it sure would make it look nicer--as opposed to a bunch of weedy and broken bricks. And, curb appeal has it's own value!

Someone had mentioned (a while back) using bricks to make a pond. How? Some more details would be helpful. I can't remember if it was sibyl or penny or loz...or someone else. Shoot!

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Sarah - Zone 5b/6
LandOfOz #39058 May 7th, 2007 at 10:16 AM
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It's like making a cement pond.

plan it out in advance on graph paper. Then dig out the hole. Starting in one corner lay down mortar below where the brick will be placed then put the mortar on the sides of the brick that will be facing the corner and place in the corner. Then lay down the mortar for the next brick and do likewise putting the mortar in the side of the brick that is going to face the last brick and the side that will be towards the dirt. And continue on like that until you get the bottom layed down. Since I have vertigo I'd do the sides the next day after the mortar has dried because I have a hard time working upside down even if it is a couple of inches. The next day I'd do the sides. One row at a time. Remember to alternate the first corner. So the first brick will face the opposite way from the bottom of the pond and each row will start in the opposite direction. I hope that makes since. Look at the corner of any brick building and you will see what I mean.

The trick is to make sure that you keep each row and especially the bottom level. Above ground you'd use a string and a couple of stakes but below ground I'm not sure what you would do.

I would suggest that you use mortar not cement because you want a dryer finder binding agent. But becareful because you won't be working as fast as a professional and you don't want it to set on you while you are still working.

And I would definitely invest in a drywall pan for the mortar. It makes handling it so much easier.

You know a trick for making the bottom level is to make up some cement but make it more liquid that normal and then pour it in the hole it will self level and give you a good base to start with once it has dried.


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tkhooper #39070 May 7th, 2007 at 10:31 AM
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Aw, shucks, I was hoping more of "line with bricks, drop in vinyl pool liner, viola! instant pool!" lol Thanks for the info, Tammy. I wonder how much mortar costs...

You guys are great here! I love all the ideas and info that you all have. Thanks so much for all you've shared so far.


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LandOfOz #39227 May 7th, 2007 at 04:54 PM
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Lime green grass, dwarf, that flushes red in the fall. What do you think of this plant? I'm not sure where I'd put it though. But I'd love to have this little fella in my garden!! (and it looks lovely at the local nursery!)

Here is my delimma with putting seating out here--first off, if it looks to the north (towards the driveway) I get this lovely view of the rental next door. Also, I'm a fairly reclusive person, don't like being able to be seen by cars as they drive by. Yes, I know, I'm weird. I'm not sure how many pics that I can post, so I'll just put in links... Here is a pic of the view from the front yard And another from the neighbor's driveway. Hope this helps.

What should I be looking for by way of height? I found some more plants that I just love including euphorbia chamelion, coleus kingswoods torch, and molten lava. My ultimate fave is the Smoldering Coleus but not available at the nursery. These are all fairly short though...

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Sarah - Zone 5b/6
LandOfOz #39405 May 7th, 2007 at 08:39 PM
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i mentioned the bench from more of a 'it'll look nice tucked in the corner' viewpoint and just something for a focal point...using it or not would be up to you.

after seeing the additional pics, i thought you could put in a fountain feature (where you're going to put the pond) either just a fountain thing or something inside or next to a pond...then have the blooming greenery behind it (around the windows).

since this is on the side where you really won't see it too much as well as you plan on moving sometime soon, i can see why you don't want to invest a lot.

how about doing a rock grouping? something similar to angelblossom's. not as tall tho - and definitely a bit more spread out to cover the area. and i would still do something around those three windows - both the trellis and the low bushes.

you could do the rock grouping very easily...use the bricks (after you pull them up) as the base and stacked to make different heights and then get rocks from where ever - your own yard or somewhere locally that you can just pick them up and take them. and just pack dirt in between everything!

oh, just looked at the japanese forest grass. that would look terrific below the three windows!!! with either a trellis or hanging baskets above (something with a complimenting color) that would look really terrific!


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Joclyn #39463 May 8th, 2007 at 04:28 AM
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You don't need the bricks if your going to use a liner. They work all by themselves. Just dig the hole in the shape of the liner and drop it in then you can if you so desire use the bricks along the top edge to create a formal look. Don't mortar them in just use some dirt and possibly moss between the bricks to give it an aged look. That way when you move you can take it with you if you want to. As far as I'm concerned pond liners are expensive so they would be a pick up and move with me item lol. Just remember that if you are not going to have a pump/moving water, that mosquitos love little ponds as breeding grounds. So you need to add fish or frogs to the pond. To keep the bug population down. Actually as long as you don't have fish the frogs will probably find the pond on their own.

I love the grass you found. That is really pretty. Like you I am drawn to shorter types of plants most of the time. I think that one would look great near the water feature.

The reason the coleus are short is that they are a tropical plant. If you are willing to give them light you can move them indoors during the fall winter spring and put them out only in summer and you'll find they can get 5 to 6 feet tall. The first time I saw this was when I was in Okinawa Japan. I did it last year and had one 3 feet tall. Of course with my apartment I just took a cutting to overwinter.

You could do a Knot garden in that area if you like short plants. That would fill the space nicely. Maybe do it in tiers using the bricks for the raised beds that create the tiers. That way you get a better visual from the street for curb appeal.



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tkhooper #40170 May 8th, 2007 at 03:23 PM
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I do not have the attention span to do a knot garden. lol

I love all the ideas and I think I'm beginning to form a plan in my brain. Which is awesome, I think. I've found about all the plants to go with a pink/burgundy/lime green scheme. I can't find any sweet potato vine though. Maybe that will be something a big box store will have. And I'm also going to see if I can go to Wichita (about an hour away) and go to the Big Lots there and check out the pots. Hmmm, online store maybe???

Here are the plants that have won my favor so far, and I don't think I want many more, trying to keep the garden spacious....

Japanese Forest Grass
Euphorbia Chameleon
Astilbe Sister Theresa
Coleus Kingswood Torch
Coleus Molten Lava
Coleus Smoldering - MY FAV
Heuchera Dolce Key Lime Pie

Clematis - Hagley Hybrid



Sarah - Zone 5b/6
LandOfOz #40907 May 9th, 2007 at 02:32 PM
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Well, here is one idea on the placement of everything... I am still looking for an annual that tolerates part shade and is either pink or burgundy (rather have burgundy though).


Sarah - Zone 5b/6
LandOfOz #41043 May 10th, 2007 at 03:43 AM
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AN2000 HAWAII SHELL PINK AGERATUM seeds
Huge, soft pink flower heads on compact, 6-8 inch heavy-blooming plants.

AN6012 OESCHBERG AMARANTHUS seeds
Amaranthus cruentus

Upright growing, with dark crimson-purplish foliage and showy blood-red flower spikes. They are excellent for fresh-cut or dried arrangements. Grows 36-40 inches tall. Packet is ΒΌ ounce.

AN5080 RED PLUME GAILLARDIA seeds
Compact, branching 15 inch plants are covered with 2 inch double deep red blooms from July until frost. Very easy to grow, it tolerates both heat and poor soil. An All-America Selections Winner. Packet is 100 seeds.

Brazilian Fireworks Maracas


Impatiens Accent Hybrid Burgundy Park's seeds

Primrose

Pincushion flower QIS Scarlet

Snapdragon Black Prince

You'll have to check to see if they will handle shade. Some of them I couldn't check. I hope something on the list gives you an idea. There are also those plants that are like primroses but not quite. I just can't remember the spelling. I know it starts with a p lol but that's it.




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tkhooper #41441 May 10th, 2007 at 01:16 PM
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I'm going to try to get my hands on those pincushions, Tammy. Oh my goodness, those are perfect. They can take light shade, are 3 ft tall, and a beautiful deep red. PERFECT! Now, is $7.00 plus probably another 7 for shipping too much too pay? I have a stinkin' 1 dollar credit to use there anyway... (At parks)


Sarah - Zone 5b/6
LandOfOz #41443 May 10th, 2007 at 01:21 PM
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That's a whole lot of money. Maybe we can find them cheaper somehwere else?


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here is some I found that I think are cheaper.

http://cgi.ebay.com/Fire-King-Pincu...184QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

it's an e-bay site.


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tkhooper #41450 May 10th, 2007 at 02:05 PM
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I checked that out. Good eye, Tammy. Hmmm, I'm gonna have to research and see how easy these are too germinate and if it's too late for my area yet.

Guess what? Last night, I nonchalantly mentioned that I'd really like to get started on removing the bricks, and my hubby did it! Well, I removed them and cleaned them and he put them in the radio flyer and stacked them in the garage. clap clap For the record, there are a ton of bricks. The area we cleaned out is the area between the house and the garage. It is about 6.5 feet wide and 14 feet deep.


Sarah - Zone 5b/6
LandOfOz #41563 May 10th, 2007 at 07:47 PM
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Sarah -
Your garden plan is taking shape nicely.

Along the house you might consider moving the lowest growing lime green plant to the front, the pink flowering plant next and the taller lime green plant after that. This puts some brightness into the back section. The same for the area along the garage, maybe a lime green sweet potato vine to trail on the ground from the hanging basket back. Since it's an annual you can experiment with it this year.

herbalyn #45028 May 15th, 2007 at 05:18 PM
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I wasn't going to use a sweet potato vine because of the lack of direct sunlight over there. However, I've spent a few days observing and the right hand side (garage) gets sunlight all afternoon. Which means I could use a SPV.

One question for the more experienced folks: is there a concern for wash-out here? DH thinks the only fix for that is to concrete the whole area. Nope. That is not gonna happen. We had discussed gutters but I was wondering if mulch would really wash out that badly in this area? What do you think? I guess the real question is how difficult is it to wash out wood mulch?

Last edited by LandOfOz; May 15th, 2007 at 05:18 PM.

Sarah - Zone 5b/6
LandOfOz #45032 May 15th, 2007 at 05:27 PM
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celosia and pigmy torch both come in a burgundy.

if you can get rite dress licorice root mulch, it won't wash away and it'll keep it's color longer than other mulches.

the company that makes it is local (they're in nj) so just about everywhere around here carries it...the walmart's started to also (they just HAVE to compete with/undercut everyone) so you might be able to get it there if no other place has it.


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Joclyn #45192 May 16th, 2007 at 03:44 AM
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wood mulch is bark and it does float so yes it could be a problem. My question is where are you thinking the washout would occur? Usually at dad's house it was just the dripline from the roof. And the fix was just to redistribute it after a heavy rain. Because it hadn't moved more than a couple of inches.

Using gravel instead of Wood mulch would be another way to stop the problem. Or the Mulch that joclyn mentioned.

Another possible solution is to add enough sand to your soil that the rain water would soak down rather than run off so that the mulch would stay in place.

Or you could put some kind of little edging around different areas to keep the mulch from moving much after a heavy rain.

These are just different ideas. You could also put french drains under the garden to take the run off out of the garden space.

celosia and pigmy torch are both full sun plants aren't they?

I've really enjoyed reading this string and hope that you will keep us posted as the work progresses. Can you by any chance take pictures? Before during and after?



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tkhooper #45339 May 16th, 2007 at 05:35 AM
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Jocyln, I love that pygmy torch. I don't know how it would do in part-shade though. Although, if I happen to see it at the garden center, I just might have to buy it... lol


We got a lot of rain yesterday, including an unusually heavy downpour. The dirt usually floods into the garage but this time, it was just from a depression in the concrete on the driveway. Very encouraging. Our dirt is mostly sand so it does drain very quickly, especially since those brick and the thick layers of plastic under them is gone.

Tammy, here are some pictures of the garden thus far. DH dug it up last night and pulled out a dozen or so bricks that were buried under the first layer. Plus tons of roots as thick as my wrist. Then we found a huge piece of metal about 2 inches under the soil. The hole is about 4ft deep. I told DH last night that maybe we should put the pond there, since the hole is already dug.

I kept the pics small because I'm sure that some still have dial-up.

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LandOfOz #45519 May 16th, 2007 at 06:52 AM
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Originally Posted by LandOfOz
.

I kept the pics small because I'm sure that some still have dial-up.



Yup, that would be me lol


~~Tam~~Those who think country life is simple....have never lived on a farm.
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Sunflowers #46111 May 16th, 2007 at 02:19 PM
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me too. Thankyou for thinking of us dial-ups lol.

I'm sure with the plastic gone then you won't have a problem with your mulch.

I too look forward to seeing it become everything you want.



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tkhooper #46177 May 16th, 2007 at 06:42 PM
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I have dial up too--when/if I find a job that is the first thing I am going to do--call my phone company & change my type of internet.--Rod says he is going to save the $120.00 a year it would cost us to have high speed internet--so right now dial up it is for me---


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JunieGirl #46179 May 16th, 2007 at 06:43 PM
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You have a lot of potential there Sarah--I can't wait to see its progress


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JunieGirl #46701 May 17th, 2007 at 09:06 AM
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I am very glad that I scaled down those pics!

Thanks for all the encouragement! I am so excited to get this dirt tilled and ready to plant. We had company last night (as some of you may already know) so we didn't get anything done out there. We'll be working on getting that metal strip out of the ground today though!!


Sarah - Zone 5b/6
#46712 May 17th, 2007 at 09:11 AM
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Yes, penny, it's a strip made out of metal. lol lol I have no idea. It's at least 3 ft long and bends off to the left, we're thinking it maybe be attached to something... Not sure what would be there though...


Sarah - Zone 5b/6
#46969 May 17th, 2007 at 12:43 PM
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That would be just my luck, Penny. I found the clematis at bluestoneperennials for only 6.97 so I'm going to make an attempt to order them this evening. We'll see though...


Sarah - Zone 5b/6
LandOfOz #47003 May 17th, 2007 at 01:55 PM
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if it is next to the building you may want to uncover it all the way before you yank it out. It could be keeping the rainwater from seeping into somewhere you don't want it. Just a thought.


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