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#359228 Aug 3rd, 2012 at 09:58 AM
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Hello all! I intend to grow my garden in containers for their foreseeable future. What size would be recommended for each type of plant? *Red Calabash Tomato (2-3 oz.), Red Core Chantenay Carrot (5"-7"), Nevada Lettuce.* These tomatoes say that they are like mini-beefsteaks, so does this mean that the 5-gal. (or more, bigger is better) standard does not necessarily apply? For instance, would say a 3-gal. container work fine without adversely effecting my yield? (I am on a bit of a tight budget and not much space with which to work with, so I am trying to be more money- and space-efficient). Moving forward, I have a pot that is 6" in diameter and 7" deep...this should be OK for the carrots, correct? I was hoping to fit 2 or 3 in one container, if at all possible (which I do not see why not, as long as there is enough room to grow, but I am new to gardening). Also, I have some smaller pots that are 5" in diameter and 4" in depth, would you say that would be sufficient space to grow the lettuce in, or no? I ask because I have read some blogs and other material online that recommend 8" in diameter and 6-8" in depth for lettuce, but I already purchased these (4) smaller ones (before doing my actual gardening research) thinking that I would be able to grow everything in them...silly me! I am just trying to figure out how I can make use of them. I am getting ready, any day now, to order some cilantro seeds along with some other herbs, should I just save these smaller ones for these smaller non-fruit-bearing crops? Any and all help and suggestions are appreciated! Thanks.

New_Gardner #359235 Aug 3rd, 2012 at 12:04 PM
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Welcome, New.
Tomatoes: Just because they say mini does not mean the plant is small. It means smaller than regular beefsteak size fruit. Tomatoes are heavy feeders and I would not do less than a 5 gallon. The good news is any bucket will do if you add drainage. So a cheap bucket, or one leftover from kitty litter or laundry detergent or whatever you can find at the dollar store or can beg from family or neighbors.
Carrots: You can try your carrots in the 7 inch deep pot. Look at your packet for spacing. Usually carrot seeds are planted too close together and then you pluck out the ones that germinate too close. I'm thinking you may be able to get more than your three in there. But they may grow stunted but perfectly edible points on those roots.
I had to look up Nevada lettuce. That is a semi-head forming lettuce. I think your small pots would do better with a smaller leaf lettuce. But you can actually try your lettuce anywhere and eat the sprouts as they do. I am not sure of your location in California, but lettuces are mostly best in the cooler weather. I would be unwilling to plant them now in my desert summer. Good luck!



~Tina
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What every gardener loves the most, Begins and ends in rich compost. (Tina)
New_Gardner #359290 Aug 6th, 2012 at 06:53 AM
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Thanks for the quick response, Tina! I really appreciate it. I am still confused about the tomatoes, though. I went back to the package they came in and it says to transplant them into 12" or a 1'x1' garden space. This seems a bit small...isn't that about a 1-gal. container? The same directions came with the lettuce and carrots. Now, I can see the lettuce and carrots doing just fine in containers this small. As for the tomatoes, now I know that I don't know much, but it still would not seem like a good idea to go less than 3-gal. for them. I was actually going to end-up experimenting with them as well as my sweet peppers and bush sugar baby watermelon that just arrived. I am going to grow one of each in both a 3-gal. and a 5-gal. pot to see the differences, if any. I am growing all organic...would you happen to know of any good organic plant foods? I have purchased a 4-pound bag of Jobe's Organic Vegetable and Tomato Granular Fertilizer, which should arrive by tomorrow. Was this a good choice??

*Any other relevant knowledge, suggestions, or good to (or must) know info out there?

New_Gardner #359292 Aug 6th, 2012 at 07:09 AM
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No, a garden space has much more room to have deep roots. They are heavy feeders and need regular water too. Pots dry up quickly. The roots may tangle a bit in those garden spaces listed but they have access to more soil deeper and the hopefully well fed there too with enriched soil.
The Job's will work ok. Finding a bag of decomposed manure is even better, mixed with your soil. Not for the root vegetables (carrots) though. Experimenting is how we all learned to garden. We have all lost plants without knowing the cause.


~Tina
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Drama Free Zone.
What every gardener loves the most, Begins and ends in rich compost. (Tina)
Tina #360654 Oct 1st, 2012 at 08:02 AM
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Thanks for the advice! The Jobe's that I have consists of bone meal, chicken manure, and a couple other decomposed ingredients w/ an N-P-K of 2-7-4 I believe. Is manure no good for root vegetables, period?? Or, just in certain dosages? Also, would you happen to know the reason why?

New_Gardner #360665 Oct 2nd, 2012 at 10:25 AM
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Manure is never recommended for use in soil where root crops are to be grown. It can burn the roots and cause rotting. But you can apply it as a side dressing for the benefits it can give. As your chicken manure is not going to be touching roots, probably, it should be OK.


~Tina
[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]

Drama Free Zone.
What every gardener loves the most, Begins and ends in rich compost. (Tina)

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