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#160921 Dec 14th, 2007 at 12:45 PM
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Boo3307 Offline OP
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I bought a pussy willow tree last year. I guess it was after season, so I kept it in the house for the winter and planted it in my backyard in the spring. It was indoors all winter. Most of the fuzzies (for lack of knowledge of the appropriate word) fell off during that time. When I planted it, I dug a good size hole and the dirt I used was the Miracle Grow soil that retains moisture for up to three months I think. I used this knowing that pussy willows thrive in moist soil. Well, last spring/summer/fall and now this winter came and went, and the tree has done nothing. No green leaves throughout the seasons, no nothing. It's just there. I don't know what happened. I didn't know if they went dormant after transplanting if they were shocked (if they can be shocked?). Should I assume it's dead and pull it? Or has this happened to someone in the past and there is something to remedy it? Could it have been due to lack of water? Or maybe it stayed in the pot indoors too long? All of the soil at the bottom of the pot it was in was covered in roots. Any ideas? Much appreciated.


Boo
Boo3307 #160937 Dec 14th, 2007 at 02:13 PM
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Sorry Boo3307, chances are that your tree died from being in the house over the winter.


~~Tam~ You can bury all your troubles by digging in the dirt.
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Sunflowers #162376 Dec 19th, 2007 at 01:52 PM
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Oh. zoink That's a shame. I guess I have a lot to learn. Thanks for the info. I didn't realize they would die from being in the house.

Last edited by Boo3307; Dec 19th, 2007 at 01:53 PM.

Boo
Boo3307 #162483 Dec 20th, 2007 at 04:26 AM
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The fact that it was root bound didn't help it either Boo, plants can die from being stressed as well. From experience I can tell you that I have not sucessfully over~wintered a shrub either. Decidous shrubs need to go dormant. Don't let it discourage you from planting, next time plant it in the ground as soon as you can.


~~Tam~ You can bury all your troubles by digging in the dirt.
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Sunflowers #163184 Dec 22nd, 2007 at 01:01 PM
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There is no soil I'm aware of that will retain moisture for 3 months - at least in the growing season if trees are drawing / wicking water from it.

If its going to retain the water, then the tree won't get it. I the tree gets it, then the soil can't retain it unless it just gets more.

Might just stick to using on-site soil next time, prepared a little and backfilled.



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willows do need to be outside in the winter time. You can transplant almost anything right up until the ground freezes in the fall, after it goes dormant. I've transplanted things in Feb during a sudden thaw. It just wakes up somewhere else. Not everything will survive this, but lots will.

willows root very easily from cuttings. If you know of a pussy willow somewhere that you can just take a few stems from, why not do that in the spring. Just put them in water until they root and then transplant and keep damp until it starts growing. I've grown several curly willows this way and one huge weeping willow. It's best to do this in the spring.

You don't even have to root them in water first. I've started them just sticking the pieces in the ground and watering. It's the cheapest way to get willow trees. Use several pieces to make sure you get some that grow.





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