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naturalizing with daffodils
#136307 Oct 4th, 2007 at 10:38 AM
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I want to perk up a section of the farm with daffodils in the spring - an area that is just grass and some trees. I don't have to work up the entire area if I want to 'naturalize' this over time do I? Meaning - I don't have to get rid of the grass? Can I just plant bulbs all over randomly in the grass and then when the daffodils are done blooming, which is about the time that mowing the lawn gets in full swing - can I just mow the grass and daffodils (a little taller than normally do so the leaves get sun for the roots the rest of their lifespan in the spring). ?? Is that how you do it?


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Re: naturalizing with daffodils
ND farm girl #136323 Oct 4th, 2007 at 01:31 PM
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Here's what the American Daffodil Society says about naturalizing:


After a while, one daffodil bulb becomes two, then suddenly it has multiplied until there are now ten bulbs. For the small grower where there is not too much space for planting in a bed, but if there is some ground at the edge of a woods or an orchard, bulbs can be planted in drifts which will add beauty to the landscape.

The area chosen for naturalizing bulbs should have good drainage and receive some sun during the day. At the edge of a woods, early blooming cultivars can be planted as they will receive enough sun to ripen the foliage before the trees mature their foliage. Choose an area where the grass can be left unmowed until foliage has matured. Hillsides are excellent spots to place drifts of bulbs.

Bulbs should be planted in drifts of like kinds and like colors. A drift of one cultivar of bright yellow is eye-catching. A drift of fifty or so bulbs will turn the heads of those who are not daffodil lovers.

After an area has been chosen for naturalizing, decide what color, how many will the space accommodate, what cultivar will do well in that spot. Some cultivars do not do well in naturalized settings. Many of the older, tired and tested cultivars will live for at least thirty years in the sod and some as many as fifty and still bring forth some blooms. If planted properly, bulbs in the sod can live and bloom for many years with a minimum of care.

When planting bulbs in a natural area to be left undisturbed for years, plant deeply for your type of soil. When planting in clay soil, the bulb ought to be planted at least eight inches deep. There are several methods of putting the bulbs into sod or soil which is not cultivated. One method is to use a broad spade, cut two lengths of the spade and a cut at each end, then throw back the sod or soil; if cut is not deep enough take out some soil, then work up soil in bottom, add a mixture of sand and peat moss, add about a tablespoon of low nitrogen fertilizer, mix well, then place a handful of sand where bulbs are to be placed, set bulbs in place and cover bulbs with soil and replace sod or top soil. Usually about five bulbs can be placed in each area. The fertilizer under the bulbs will keep bulbs growing for years.

Another way of planting in the sod needs a strong-armed person who can sink a crowbar six to eight inches into the ground. Then work the hole by rotating the bar, then drop in sand, peat and fertilizer mix, add a handful of sand and then the bulb. Fill hole with sand. A third method is quite new and a good one for the gardener with money to invest. There is a new drill method. For those with an outdoor electricity source, a half-inch drill with a three-inch bit works well. As many as a half bushel of bulbs can be planted in a short time. For those out in the field or away from a power outlet, the battery-powered drill with rechargeable batteries can be used. One can use this drill about four hours between charges.

Some varieties which make beautiful drifts and last well are Ice Follies, Tete-a-Tete, flower Record, Delibes, Unsurpassable, Barrett Browning, Scarlet Gem, Geranium, Cheerfulness, Peeping Tom, Mount Hood, Spellbinder, Carlton, and Viking. There are many others which will thrive with little care.




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Re: naturalizing with daffodils
alankhart #136338 Oct 4th, 2007 at 02:44 PM
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That is a lot of good info Alan. I have a small hillside that I have been looking for something to do with it. It is steep enough that it can't be mowed but it isn't too big of an area. I think I might try this. I wonder if I can plant something else there too so that I have more blooms throughout the summer?!? why

Re: naturalizing with daffodils
#136353 Oct 4th, 2007 at 03:32 PM
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Jess, how about some Asiatic Lilies? I guess you could use any kind of bulb in an area like that.....daylilies?

Re: naturalizing with daffodils
#136601 Oct 5th, 2007 at 06:57 AM
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I was thinking daylilies as well...very easy to care for and will help to cover up the dying daffodil foliage.


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Re: naturalizing with daffodils
alankhart #136628 Oct 5th, 2007 at 08:50 AM
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I love daylilies! flwr thumbup

Re: naturalizing with daffodils
#138176 Oct 8th, 2007 at 07:41 AM
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Yeah maybe I will do that! I want something easy and carefree to put in there.

Re: naturalizing with daffodils
#139134 Oct 10th, 2007 at 07:29 AM
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I have most of mine planted around the trees.they get sun cause the trees are bare still when the foliage is around.I have only one circle plot that at one time was around a birdbath& i've since added to this and have golf tees in ground so know the location as i've added some grape hycaniths but those have done reliable.I've seen a lady near sons school that has the front section of her yard naturalized near road and shes added blue bonnets as well and seen some reds also here& there.It does cause her to mow a lil later but the foliage drying is in amoung the blue bonnets so not quiet as veiwable.

I got 3 bulbs of pink charm.i'll pick a new spot out for naturalizeing& then will move some of my paperwhites to join them...once they emerge again.Under the one tree where most of them are.....I have some white garlic mixed in too.


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