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Joined: Aug 2007
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I was at Walmart awhile ago and there were bouquets of dozen long stemmed roses on sale. One dozen looked okay, they weren't too withered so I bought them for my boyfriend to give to him with breakfast that morning. :wink: We put them in a vase of water with the little tablets that came with them in the kitchen near the window, which doesn't get that much sunlight. I accidently knocked the vase over and had to fill it with water alone. Its been over a week and the roses look dead, however; theres fresh green healthy looking stems with leaves growing from the long stemmed roses. Theres five of these, the largest being about three inches long. I don't know the first thing about roses or gardening. The only plants I have are bushes outside along the fence that I cut sometimes, but otherwise leave well alone. I would like to try to get rose bushes out of these, but I don't know how. My mom said to try cutting the new growing stems off, put the ends in the ground, and cover them with a jar?? Is this correct? Can someone please advise me on what to do?? Also, I was wondering if this is a common occurance from store bought bouquets? Thanks!!

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Well, I've been reading up, but I still have a question. I was wondering if I'm supposed to cut the new sprouts with leaves off and propagate that or use the entire long stemmed roses and leave the sprouts on the stems?? Can someone please shed some light on this??

Joined: Nov 2006
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Hi, I think this is quite easy to do ... but as no-one else has replied yet, have a look at this advice

Dr. Malcolm M. Manners
Leaves -- roses root best if the cutting has some leaves still attached, to provide sugars from photosynthesis as well as root-promoting hormones. Some varieties will root from leafless cuttings, but it's better to allow two or three leaves to remain. Keep a spray bottle of water handy to mist over the cuttings while working on them, to keep them crisp, since wilted cuttings often fail to root.
Cuts and "wounding" -- roses can form roots at any point along the stem, so the exact site of the cut is not important. Many people "wound" the base of the cutting, either by making 1/2- to 1-inch vertical slits through the bark, or by slicing a strip of bark off one or two sides of the base of the cutting with the clipper blade. Difficult varieties often benefit from such wounding, sending out roots all along the wound.
Rooting hormones -- You can root most rose varieties without the use of hormone preparations. This is because rose cuttings contain auxin (indoleacetic acid -- "IAA"), a natural root-promoting hormone. It is produced by the leaves and growing buds or shoot tips and accumulates at the bottom of a cutting, where the roots will form. But some roses apparently don't produce adequate supplies of auxin and are difficult to root. If they produce any roots at all, they are few and weak. So, many growers apply a commercial hormone preparation to stimulate the production of strong roots. These products all contain synthetic auxin, usually indolebutyric acid (IBA) and/or naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA).
Moisture -- One of the most important factors in successfully rooting cuttings is maintaining adequate moisture, both in the soil and in the form of humidity in the air. Place the cuttings in pots of moist sand or potting soil, then cover them with a plastic bag, mayonnaise jar or inverted two-liter soft drink bottle with the top cut off, creating a small tent or "greenhouse" to maintain high humidity around the cuttings.
Light -- roses root best in bright light. But when using the mini-greenhouse method, it's important to avoid overheating by giving some shade from hot, midday sun. Put the cuttings in bright shade, such as against the north wall of a building or under a tree, to allow rooting without too much heat build-up.



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